The Cool Carousel: A Musical Observation of the Hegelian Mambo over a Generation

1998:

2006:

2012:

The problem for the so suave neo-reactionary Gamester, you see, isn’t that Eros is barbaric. It is that Eros currently isn’t white enough. If we can just make it more white–as the good Lord intended with Greece–it will be a better god.

Cha cha cha…

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18 thoughts on “The Cool Carousel: A Musical Observation of the Hegelian Mambo over a Generation

  1. This is especially funny since internet/PUA/”Christian” game is lifted from urban black culture’s “he got game”, but without the (surprisingly) healthier sense of perspective about it that culture had.

    That culture didn’t try to systematize, the whole point was just a playful acknowledgement of what they observed. Sometimes a think can be overthought.

  2. @TUW

    Welcome.

    This is especially funny since internet/PUA/”Christian” game is lifted from urban black culture’s “he got game”, but without the (surprisingly) healthier sense of perspective about it that culture had.

    You’re right that the systematization of the elevation of Eros isn’t going to save anyone from the consequences of doing so, but “funny” and “healthier” are the wrong words here. The 72% out-of-wedlock birth rate of American blacks, and the fact that 36% of abortions are performed on the children of American blacks are not signals of a healthy perspective.

  3. No, I mean that how black people using the term treated the basic idea was healthier than what the white people reverse engineering various bits of it do. It’s a relative difference, not a sign that urban black culture was all that great. They were recording an observation and did so mostly in an amused way. That’s healthier than a lot of what I see in the game-o-sphere.

    Slightly tangentially, the OOW numbers have been stable for about a generation. That is not really discussed by anyone, whether mainstream or dissident right, and it seems a very interesting point if one wishes to drop the percentage.

  4. @Denise

    The number of black women having children oow has also been steadily declining for decades now and is at its lowest since the 60s.

    That’s going to happen as American blacks twirl in step with American whites by generally avoiding children. That would be the reality behind TUW interesting point: Blacks have finally adopted birth control, abortion, and surgical sterility.

  5. @ The Unreal Woman and Denise,

    Where did you get your data?

    Because frankly, the data I found, which uses the U.S. Census Bureau information says something quite different: http://imgur.com/KE7v3Cg

    Not to mention the Heritage Foundation, the CDC birth data, and politifact all support the data that is in that chart. It shows a 50% from 1930 to 2008. It is a bit more stable in the 2000’s but being stable around 60-80% is not something to be quite proud of.

    The CDC data actually states this:

    That the percentage of all black births, being unmarried is increasing.

    HOWEVER the amount of births for every 1000 unmarried black women is decreasing.

    What this suggests, is exactly what Cane said:
    “That’s going to happen as American blacks twirl in step with American whites by generally avoiding children. That would be the reality behind TUW interesting point: Blacks have finally adopted birth control, abortion, and surgical sterility.”

    To to sum: overall black women are having less children, which is leading to less births per every 1000 unmarried black women. But out of all black people being born, a higher percentage than ever, will be to unmarried black women.

    Lastly, whether you elevate Eros above God in a “game-o-sphere” way or an “amused and healthy” way, you are still elevating Eros above God.

  6. True: the overall percentage of black babies born to unwed women in unacceptably high (72%).

    Also true: the numbers of black women (married or no) having babies at all has been in deep decline for some time now.

    The truths aren’t mutually exclusive JatGP. Of the black women having babies, most are unmarried because black women as a group are less likely to be married, particularly during their youngest and most fertile years. There just aren’t as many black women having babies.

    To the OP: I’ve heard the expression “running game on a woman” since I was a child. The connotation was always that the man was doing something ethically questionable, even when it worked.

    The notion of sanitizing it by codifying into a workable system that might be useful to the married Christian man is a concept that I never would have anticipated. That it is even deemed necessary says terrible things about most Christian women as well of course.

  7. I love the weird al song. It’s about being happily self-actualized about who and what they are, while at the same time having a kind of nagging desire to be part of the zeitgeist. Which eventually became true because now everybody wants to coopt the subculture. Now “OG” nerds are getting frozen out of their own sub-cultural institutions, and still aren’t getting laid because….. they’re nerds.

    Oh well, I managed to get out of that hell hole of suck, and got married. Doing pretty well at the “greater beta” thing.

    Besides “gangstas” loved having me around. I had useful things, and I could deal effectively with the cops.

  8. @Elspeth, TUW, and Denise

    There is no way to paint this particular subject as if the American black community as a whole is moving in the right direction, or even had clear heads about the murderous direction in which they were headed; e.g., “playful acknowledgement of what [blacks] observed”, and, “a surprisingly healthier perspective”.

    It is not incumbent upon anyone who happens to be an American black woman to make a defense for themselves by defending the trends of all American blacks. We each only have to make an accounting for ourselves, individually. However; if we identify ourselves with a particular ideology, practice, or paradigm, then we need to be ruthless in our discernment of it.

    @Guru

    Welcome.

  9. It is not incumbent upon anyone who happens to be an American black woman to make a defense for themselves by defending the trends of all American blacks. We each only have to make an accounting for ourselves, individually.

    I agree. I have just always been of the mind that things in the black community are bad enough as they stand. No need for us (right-leaning commentators) to go out of our way to make it sound worse. That’s often the vibe I get as I read.

    Not from you specifically, Cane.

  10. If it wasn’t systematised, it might just be because it was happening often enough that it didn’t need to be. Conversely, the general reason why the systemic form appeals to people is that it isn’t yet cultural or widespread. The issue isn’t whether or not the system works, it’s what it is an attempt to achieve, or is structured around.

  11. Good conversation. A key question, already asked by Cane (and not aimed at Elspeth) was “what point was being made by stating that black illegitimacy is in decline?”. While there is no reason to ruminate endlessly about dysfunction, there is even less (in my opinion) to reflexively “white guilt” the topic. is that not the same reflex that gives us NAWALT? Those reactions are birthed at the same synapse.

  12. To agree with Elpseth somehat, using the analogy I drew just prior, if we make the manosphere/gender issue sound hyperbolic….if we exxagerate it, why would that not be just as bad as waxing repititiously on about black dysfunctions? Well, because if you strike up a conversation with a random cohort about urban black dysfunction, they will know and agree it exists. If you strike up about gender manosphere issues, they will fight tooth and nail at worst, and glaze over at best, neither one of those things even acknowledging that the problem exists.
    So….I agree with Elspeth.

  13. The white nerds on the “White & Nerdy” video are cute. Like teddy bears one can cuddle with.

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