Definition of Game

Proposed Definition:

“Game is the rhetoric of manliness”, or, “Game is the rhetoric of masculinity.” I like the first one better. Discuss.

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A Series of Negatives on Inherent Unfairness, Part V

The story of Creation and the Garden of Eden is well-travelled ground for the Christians (and some non-Christians) in the Manosphere. I want to discuss an aspect of it that I have never realized before last night, and have never seen discussed–though I might have just missed it. Each part is a really short bit that isn’t talked about in scripture explicitly, but is unavoidable once you see it between the lines. By unavoidable, I do not mean that I have the answer, but that it is a question that should definitely be asked.

One of the ways in which the stories of the Bible, and the parables of Jesus, are so good is because they are the field in which new treasures are always being found.

44 “The kingdom of heaven is like treasure hidden in a field, which a man found and covered up. Then in his joy he goes and sells all that he has and buys that field.”

This is part V of a series in digging for what is under the surface. I was going to do several parts, but I have some things I want to say, and I need to get through this so I can build upon it. You can find the other parts here: Part IPart IIPart III, Part IV.

Picking up where we left off:

These are the generations
of the heavens and the earth when they were created,
in the day that the Lord God made the earth and the heavens.

When no bush of the field was yet in the land and no small plant of the field had yet sprung up—for the Lord God had not caused it to rain on the land, and there was no man to work the ground, and a mist was going up from the land and was watering the whole face of the ground— then the Lord God formed the man of dust from the ground and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life, and the man became a living creature. And the Lord God planted a garden in Eden, in the east, and there he put the man whom he had formed.

Adam knew what the earth looked like outside the Garden of Eden. He knew that it was still desolate. It’s also another view of the provider and protector role–the husband role–that God plays in the life of mankind, even men. He prepares a dwelling for the object of His love, and  brings him to it. He doesn’t build it with Adam. He presents it to Adam; as if to say: “You know the life you had before, but I have much better in store for you.”

And out of the ground the Lord God made to spring up every tree that is pleasant to the sight and good for food. The tree of life was in the midst of the garden, and the tree of the knowledge of good and evil.

This is the first mention of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. Of course, all trees and plants were mentioned inclusively in chapter 1, in the description of the third day.

10 A river flowed out of Eden to water the garden, and there it divided and became four rivers.11 The name of the first is the Pishon. It is the one that flowed around the whole land ofHavilah, where there is gold. 12 And the gold of that land is good; bdellium and onyx stone are there. 13 The name of the second river is the Gihon. It is the one that flowed around the whole land of Cush. 14 And the name of the third river is the Tigris, which flows east of Assyria. And the fourth river is the Euphrates.

Notice the symbolism that the whole area, perhaps the whole earth, is watered from within the Garden of Eden. Yes, water springs up from the ground to water plants in the same way that all of creation testifies to God’s existence, and goodness. But the water literally pours from the mouth of Eden; as if it is the source of all good things, where God dwells with man.

15 The Lord God took the man and put him in the garden of Eden to work it and keep it.

Man was to work in God’s home–right from the beginning. Adam wasn’t to lounge around all day eating grapes, but to garden and farm, really. Of course God created and gave the home, but it is important that man tend it. It’s one of his purposes. It’s manly housework.

It should also be obvious that famous “curse” in chapter 3 that man works if false. He was working from the beginning, but in perfection, as he was told. As. He. Was. Told.

16 And the Lord God commanded the man, saying, “You may surely eat of every tree of the garden,17 but of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil you shall not eat, for in the day that you eat of it you shall surely die.”

Why is it even there? Why is there a tree there that has the power to cause death? We know from chapter 1 that God made every seed-bearing tree:

11 And God said, “Let the earth sprout vegetation, plants yielding seed, and fruit trees bearing fruit in which is their seed, each according to its kind, on the earth.”

and that seed-bearing trees are made to eat. All of them.

29 And God said, “Behold, I have given you every plant yielding seed that is on the face of all the earth, and every tree with seed in its fruit. You shall have them for food.

So what is this tree doing here? We have to deduce that this tree bears no seeds, since it is not good for eating. What does that signify? Why does God give no instruction on the Tree of Life? Can man eat of it, or not?

It’s interesting that the forebear to the instrument of Christ’s death was created on the third day. He could have been killed by rocks, or a sword, or hanged, or any number of things, but he was nailed to what is decidedly a very strange, but obvious tree; a tree that bore fruit that was good to eat (the Bread of Life), and yet had no seed (children). It is like the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil, and mentioned with it, but not it. What is left? The Tree of Life. I’ve never read that anywhere that I know of–it just struck me as I was writing. And as I wrote the previous sentences, it dawned on me that Christ returns on the third day after this sign of the third day–which would make it, significantly, the sixth day, the day man is made.

When I discover symbolism like this, I don’t always know what to make of it: imaginings, or insight? It reminds me of the danger of speaking in tongues*, so take it in that spirit and use your own judgment. Surely other theologians have spoken on this? I don’t read many theologians; any theologians, really.

And where are the angels? And Lucifer? If you told me that Satan had went before God, and demanded that God allow him to test Adam, God might let him. He might say Satan may test him, but it may not touch Adam or his wife. Just like Job.

That’s pure speculation, not even symbolism, but it seems reasonable to me.

*With which I have always had a hard time. I’ve never heard it that I know of.

Age Before Beauty

Since we have a perfect society, I must practice my imperfect habit outside. This affords me a lot of opportunity to interact with other imperfects; like homeless people. Something about my cigarettes draws them to me. I haven’t fully worked it out yet, but it seems that they have taken pity on my tobacco burden, and seek to relieve me of it. The miff-ery when I say “No” suggests that they perceive my strength as the weakness it really is.

Or they’re opportunists. One never knows about these things.

Today I was approached by another imperfect. I dragged on my Pall Mall as her cab rolled up in front of the sign that demarked my proper shameful pose: “Smoking in This Area ONLY!” She opened the door, and then fumbled around with a small coin purse to pay the cabbie. After managing that tremulous event, she stepped out onto the sidewalk. Her open purse was in one hand, and her bills of change in the other. A thin stack of papers was being shuffled back and forth between them, as she worked out the frustration of being short one hand. I’ve been there myself. With a cigarette and phone in one hand, coffee in the other; contemplating whether Steve Jobs had predicted the nose swipe, or if it was an organic good.

She was old; sixty-five at least. Her hair was naturally grey and white, but long for an old woman. Most white women have long chopped their hair off–by forty at the latest. The problem posed by less hair is solved with more color. They dip the remainder to match their old, natural colors; fire-engine red, cake yellow, and pitch black. A few choose to age gracefully, with au naturale purple.

She walked up to me smiling, clutching those papers and money in her gnarled left hand; her little blue coin purse in her right. All of them in front of her sagging breasts that finally sloped up when the laws of physics demanded they give way to her swollen middle; pregnant with death.

“You look like you might know something.”

I raised my eyebrows in alarm, as I inhaled.

“Do you know where I can find WXZY conference?”

I exhaled a deadpan, “You have arrived.”

“I’m sorry?”

“You’re looking for WXZY, right?”

“Yes, I am.” She beamed while whisps of iron waved over her wrinkled face. It lacked any paint at all, so I could see every age spot, and some spidering rosacea, but she had no caking in the crinkles.

I smirked. “Then you have arrived.”

“Oh, thank you! Now, since you know, let me ask you: Do you know where the volunteers meet? I’m supposed to see Patty with Volunteers Are Us.”

“I don’t. However; if you go up two sets of escalators, then look to your right. On the carpet, you’ll see a desk with some people gathered behind it. They know where to go.”

“So, go up an escalator…” she trailed off.

“Yes, two escalators..” I repeated my directions; motioning up the escalators twice, and then swooping my hand right, fingers extended.

“Thank you so much.” By this time, she had managed to wrangle her bills back into the little coin purse. “You know”, she said, as she swatted her folded papers at the air; an imitation of patting my arm, “I was destined to meet you.”

“Perhaps so. Good day.”

It’s almost always a pleasure to talk to old women. They’re so much prettier than the young ones.

(Edit: I changed “pregnant with age”, to “pregnant with death”; which is what I had in mind. I originally had “time”, but I think death is best.)

Rebuke

I think, ultimately, I’ve given the manosphere’s denizens far too much credit. There’s this conspiracy aspect to it that I’ve taken too seriously. This is, ironically, probably because I lack empathy. Because I’m aware of this failing, I try to take people seriously.

When I first came here, to the manosphere, I said, essentially, “Stop being such a pussy.” That did not go over well. Not only did it not go over well: the reaction was vitriolic.

“NO NO NO NO! You don’t understand the nature of the problem facing men today! It’s not men who are the problem, but women! They’re everywhere!”

They are everywhere. They don’t seem to ever shut up, sit down, or even stay out of the the locker-room–literally or figuratively. (I long for a bar with no TV, or women but perhaps the wenches…but I repeat myself.) Well, I thought, I can relate. I’ve had a lot of problems with women. Namely: that in the past my wife had not wanted to have sex with me anymore, but many other women did. I was skeptical, though, that women were the problem because I believe what scripture says about men being the leaders. Not only that it can be true, or should be true, but that it IS true; that while God’s design can be corrupted, it cannot be destroyed. We get the leaders we deserve, so to speak. Not only deserve, but need.

Now I’m confronted with this conspiracy theory of Ultimate Feminism that is oppressing men–even good ones–and it’s upheld by some very smart and well-spoken people. It has to be a conspiracy because it is circumventing the natural order, as I understand it. That is some serious shit. We MUST be talking about the ultimate conspiracy–the one that goes back to the Garden of Eden.

And there’s this guy Roissy who sounds like he’s been living in my head. The only difference is that he embraces his nature, while I’m trying to shun it. I can feel what little empathy I have left seeping away. The Dark Side feels good. That’s partially how I know it’s dark. Pain is the hallmark of the teacher.

So, what do I do? “If you’re going to be stupid, you’ve gotta be tough.” Dive into the pain. You can see this in my writing. I want to get pummeled here, and I want to pummel, as well; otherwise no one learns anything. This is why some think I’m a troll. They can’t understand why in the world I would spend my time writing thousands and thousands of words, unless I’m either trying to sidetrack the conversation, or because I just want to berate people. No, no. When someone like Dalrock, or Matt King, or Desiderius, or Vox focuses their efforts on destroying what I’ve said, I genuinely think, “Oh thank God.”, and “Oh shit” at the same time. Because while I’ll be damned if I’m going to give up my position without a fight, I am well aware that I have had to unlearn, and relearn many many things, and it’s almost always for the better. Almost. My experiences as Roissy (long before I’d ever heard of him) were the exception.Those were maiming wounds.

Now, one of these epicenters where the conspiracy is propagated from is church. It certainly is in a lot of sermons across all denominations. I’ve witnessed them myself in MANY churches; nearly all of them, in fact. My solution? Well, men need to start going to church. We need to re-capture it. The problem with a groundwar in Asia is that you can’t hold ground without men, and there simply aren’t enough men to cover Asia. The church is hardly Asia, is it? Or is it? Again: this is the Ultimate Conspiracy. So, I think in terms of the ultimate conspiracy of scripture–the attempted overthrow of Heaven. There is no other conspiracy worth spending time on, if we believe what we say we believe.

But going to church is the ultimate folly, according to the manosphere. In the way that I believe men are corrupted by, say, going to a strip club, denizens of the manosphere think going to church corrupts men. It is only acceptable to either

  • Quit church altogether (what is the point, and how can disbanding make us stronger?)
  • Go only to home-based churches (which seems very dubious to me, as our problem is lack of authority; not a surfeit of it.)
  • Go to a night-club or strip-club, because those women at least know how to treat men, and for only a drink, or a dollar.

Now, I’m getting the sense that these men really HAVE been wholly corrupted. Their pain is such that they would choose what is obviously very stupid. Paradoxically, this lends weight to the Ultimate Conspiracy theory, so I inquire more fervently, more ardently. I try to fit the pieces of the puzzle into the only Ultimate Conspiracy I know and believe to be true.

Backlash. Sure, I got some of it wrong; maybe a lot of it, but it didn’t merit the whipsaw words that it garnered. What do I do? What you always do under fire: Go to cover; which means scripture. I go back to the very beginning, and, yes, I can see some of this ultimate conspiracy, but I’m so invested now in the words of the manosphere that the legitimate conspiracy I find can only be reconciled if we understand that if we’d simply trusted God to sort things out, and continue His revelation of the world–we’d not be in this mess. That makes sense. It makes total sense. It is the paradox of knowledge and faith.

That culminates in my blog, and my comments here over the past few weeks; which has been something of a maelstrom, at least for me. Heavy-hitters have been discussing and dissing my words for weeks now.

To come back to this post: I try to take the opportunity to start again. What. Is. Game? What I don’t realize is that somewhere along the way, my priorities changed. I’m no longer trying to discern truth: I’m trying to be in solidarity with the manosphere, but I’m still telling myself that I’m looking for truth.** Danger says:

Because it involves (not)* being fearful of your masculinity.

Never fear your masculinity. God made you that way for a reason…..one of them being that it is a complement to femininity.

Do not fear being cocky, that is masculine.
Do not fear being aggressive, that is masculine.
Do not fear talking sexual and desiring a woman, that is masculine.

The real issue at hand, is that somehow people are accepting the notion that it is ok for a woman to define what is acceptable behavior for men.

I am gobsmacked. THIS WAS MY STARTING POSITION! My retort:

So that’s it? Game is not being fearful? It takes dozens of new definitions, hundreds of blogs, and perhaps millions of comments for a few thousand men to work out that Game is courage?

was not born of flippancy at the problems of men, but at what felt like (there’s my mistake) the unmitigated GALL to say that everything I had been working for is pointless; that I had the proper attitude from the start. It is the worst sort of farce because it is a farce I perpetrated on myself. I should have seen it coming: I had the faith in men’s ability to lead, but I did not continue in that faith, and so investigated the “knowledge” of the manosphere.

Danger is right. Matt King is right. It is commonly known here, and derided, but it is the only solution: White Knighting for a slut. Yes, this is required of the Christian, for the family, and for a stable and prosperous society.

What I should have done is taken a step back, seen the group engaged in the sexual confusion that it is, and said:

“Men, what are you doing? Stop being pussies, and start that by stopping the circle-jerk. Then go to your church, and reclaim her.”

*Parenthetical edit to retain the original meaning.

**Not only this, but I was well-taught, so bits of my white-knighting frame come through in spite of my best efforts to reign him in. This confuses my message, and those reading my message. I’m all over the map, get angry at the confusion, and so discredit myself.

Monocular Vision

I’ve been in one city that is not my city for entirely too long. There was a mess-up in the scheduling, and I ended up being here 3 days between events. I need to go home for a bit, but that won’t happen for just over a week.

When you’re on the road, everything is…well, I was going to say an adventure, but I do it so much that it feels like a chore. So, no, it’s not an adventure. You do have to prepare, though, and be diligent in where you go, and what you do. Nothing is automatic. I can’t wake up and stumble into the kitchen to make coffee. If I want coffee, but not the really unholy concoction that’s in my hotel room (even a 5-star hotel room) I have to think about where I’m going. Here, I’ve got access to the club; so I just have to go down the hall. Still, it’s terribly bad form to stroll down to the club in your skivvies. I have to get dressed, and since I’m getting dressed, I might as well shower and shave.

You can see how this is screwing up my routine, because I haven’t even talked about a cigarette yet, which is the next thought after coffee, and very often before. Caldo law says I get up, pull on the basketball shorts I left next to the bed last night, make coffee, and go out to the garage to smoke a cigarette, check my email, and read the news. Here, on the road, I have to get dressed, and shower, and run through the rigamarole of getting Ready For The Day before I get a taste of civilization.

Going out, among people, first thing in the morning to get coffee, is an exercise in manners. Those are those words we say and gestures we make to keep from grunting and and scowling and shoving each other in the hallways as we make our way to the coffee. When you first start doing this, you will make the mistake of saying something stupid, like, “How are you?” You’d be surprised how many people answer this, like I care before coffee and a cigarette. Worse are the people who, in their rage, flip it back on you: “Good. How are you?”

Bastard. Now I have to lie, or tell them the truth; which sounds like: “Mnuh.” The lie it is. “Good, thanks.”

At some point, I realized that it’s a lot easier to sound like I’ve got a monocle, and say, “Good morning.” “Good morning” is great because I’m not talking about me, but you. I’m expressing a wish that you have a good morning…and, generally, I do. I’m hoping it’s so good that you don’t need any coffee, and so won’t get in my way, or take the last cup; making me wait for the next pot to brew.

The ritual of manners is so useful that I began using it all the time. I say, “Good morning”, or “Good day”, “Good afternoon”, “Good evening”, and even “Good night” all day long. Everyone responds in kind, and I can tell by the smile playing on their lips, that the tension, caused by their fear that I might ask them how they’re doing, has been released from their souls.

On this event, every day I had to pass by another vendor. She is 38-40, with long mostly brown hair that is streaked in that way middle-aged white American women are so fond of. She was thin and tallish; about 5′ 10″ in heels, with narrow non-child-bearing hips, and a boob job. In a word, attractive, if you’re into aging careerists. And every day, I said, “Good morning”, to her. And as I went out during the day for another cigarette, or a refill of coffee, I’d invoke the manners again. “Good day.” “Good evening.” “Another day!”

On the third day, I got a package delivered to me, but it wasn’t for me, and it wasn’t from someone I recognized. I did what anyone does when they get a package they didn’t order: I opened it. It was a specialized lock, and it had a note, “Pamela- Here is the lock…” It’s really not important what the note said, but I thought I should find out who Pamela was since she obviously needed something special locked.

I had to walk by the careerist woman again, and, on a whim, I asked, “Does the name Pamela mean anything to you?” She looked like a Pamela.

“Yes.”

“And? What does it mean?”

“That’s my name.”

“Then this is for you.” And I handed off the package, and went to refill my coffee. The rest of the day, when I’d smile, and say “Good afternoon”, she’d say something different. She started asking, “How are you?” Criminny. Now what? The lie, again? I hate lying. That’s why I put on the verbal monocle. It’s not that I’m trying not to sin, or be noble. I simply don’t feel like I should have to, but to say, “This coffee is trying to leak out of me, and I am getting irritated that I’m still in this stupid hotel with all you vapid sales people.” is to disembowel oneself, professionally.

“Well, that’s an excellent question, I’m glad you brought me up.”, and I smile and walk away.

This went on until the fifth day, except that from that package-point on, she said, “Good morning”, to me before I got near her table. She continually trespassed all over my monocle manners; asking me how I was doing; engaging me in smalltalk; informing me that there was coffee in the staff office (the succubus).

On the afternoon of this fifth day, the next to last day, as I was walking out of my area towards the elevators, and past her table, she was putting on lip gloss just as I saw her. She smiled sheepishly, as if I’d caught her doing something. She shrugged and put her hands in the air, still holding the lip gloss in her left; sort of pointed at me.

“Teehee. Lip gloss.”

No shit. A disembowelment warning flashed. Better not say that, either. “Is that for me?” I blurted.

“Sure. Where do you want me to put it?”

“Oh…heh…yeah, I’m going to go get some coffee.”

“Are you leaving for the night?”

“No, not yet. That’s why I’m getting the coffee.”

“Oh. Ok. Well-”

“Good evening.”

This is my life, about 20 weeks out of the year. Several times during those weeks, in one way or another, some woman I don’t really know offers to apply lip gloss to my body. Because I delivered the mail. I can read people very well, but I can’t always relate to them so great.

A Series of Negatives on Inherent Unfairness, Part IV

The story of Creation and the Garden of Eden is well-travelled ground for the Christians (and some non-Christians) in the Manosphere. I want to discuss an aspect of it that I have never realized before last night, and have never seen discussed–though I might have just missed it. Each part is a really short bit that isn’t talked about in scripture explicitly, but is unavoidable once you see it between the lines. By unavoidable, I do not mean that I have the answer, but that it is a question that should definitely be asked.

One of the ways in which the stories of the Bible, and the parables of Jesus, are so good is because they are the field in which new treasures are always being found.

44 “The kingdom of heaven is like treasure hidden in a field, which a man found and covered up. Then in his joy he goes and sells all that he has and buys that field.”

This is part IV of a series in digging for what is under the surface. I was going to do several parts, but I have some things I want to say, and I need to get through this so I can build upon it. You can find the other parts here: Part IPart II, Part III.

Before I start Genesis chapter 2, I want to point out that in Chapter 1, God never says that anything is evil, or not good. This is one of those negatives of the picture to which we should pay attention. God is not on a manic spree saying everything He does is good simply because He did it. He is working deliberately, and when the work is finished, then He assesses it. It is then that He pronounces it good.

I need to be very careful here, but it seems to me that something happened before the appearance of man; something God does not approve of (in the sense that He would proclaim it good) happens. At some point Lucifer rejects God’s authority, and becomes evil, he becomes the Devil–the Adversary, or Prosecutor; and Satan, the Deceiver. We know from the story of Job that Lucifer comes before the Lord and accuses man of sinfulness–which God allows! Regardless, God does not take the time to say, “This is not good”, or “This is evil.” In other words: He does not go around bemoaning bad things that happen, or pointing out faults (though He will later).

Which brings up a question: If God wants us to do right, and does not want us to do wrong, why does God allow the existence of Satan in the first place?

Which brings up another question: What is Satan doing while God is creating the universe, light, day, the Earth, plants, and animals?

I’ll come back to this in another post.

The first three verses of Genesis 2 are strangely placed to me, because they are clearly linked to the process of creation that is in chapter 1.

2 Thus the heavens and the earth were finished, and all the host of them. And on the seventh day God finished his work that he had done, and he rested on the seventh day from all his work that he had done. So God blessed the seventh day and made it holy, because on it God rested from all his work that he had done in creation.

Why does God rest? Is He tired? If so, in what sense? God “hath not a body like man”, so he can’t be physically tired. He’s also omnipotent.

I think this is the first example of God, the father and husband of mankind, condescending to man. God could just tell man to rest every so often, but He has expressed Himself so far as a god of action. His way is to be with us, not just give direction. He seldom speaks, and when He does it is to praise. When He gives direction it is a positive, and it is an exhortation to be like Him:

28 And God blessed them. And God said to them, “Be fruitful and multiply and fill the earth and subdue it, and have dominion over the fish of the sea and over the birds of the heavens and over every living thing that moves on the earth.” 29 And God said, “Behold, I have given you every plant yielding seed that is on the face of all the earth, and every tree with seed in its fruit. You shall have them for food. 30 And to every beast of the earth and to every bird of the heavens and to everything that creeps on the earth, everything that has the breath of life, I have given every green plant for food.”

God has already been fruitful. He has multiplied everything. He has filled the earth, and subdued it. He has dominion over all things, and nothing He has made is forbidden Him. So, when God rests, this is him living in understanding with the weaker vessel; treating us as heirs with Him of the grace of life from the beginning of time. Where else do we see this?

Likewise, husbands, live with your wives in an understanding way, showing honor to the woman as the weaker vessel, since they are heirs with you of the grace of life, so that your prayers may not be hindered.

It’s not a matter of being “right”, or  “good”, or “fair” for God to rest. It is a necessity for man to rest, and because God wants to be with man, He rests with us. When we don’t rest, we are expressing multiple things:

  • We know what we need better than God.
  • We are insulting Him by working when He rests (as if we are the stronger)
  • Worst of all: We are spurning his affections.

A very common thing to see in the household of a “Good Christian Woman”–in addition to the monstrously painful sin of a wife denying her husband fleshly pleasures–is the less painful but still utterly rebellious and dysfunctional charade of industry. It often occurs when a man asks his wife to recline with him, and she insists that she doesn’t have time for him because she’s too busy cleaning the house.

Who would say cleaning the house is unimportant? To ask the question is to miss the point.

Priest, Prophet, and Provider of My Family–Not Yours

A commenter the other day called me a preacher. I want to be clear that I do not claim to be a pastor for any man or woman except those God put in my house. My interpretations of scripture–though I believe them to be sound–are not themselves scripture, and I do not hold anyone to account for them. In fact, what I write here is as much an investigation more than a proclamation. I don’t pray publicly, either.

Now go to church. There are people there that need your help.

The Stupidity of the Christian Perspective, Among Others

Whenever I see (or sometimes use, myself) the phrase “for the Christian”, or, “from the Christian perspective”, I also see–hidden just below those words–a pit-trap. There is no other perspective worth considering.

10 There is severe discipline for him who forsakes the way;
whoever hates reproof will die.
11 Sheol and Abaddon lie open before the Lord;
how much more the hearts of the children of man!
12 A scoffer does not like to be reproved;
he will not go to the wise.

If we Christians accept the premise of Christianity–that God created us, became man, died for the sins of all mankind, and is resurrected for our sakes–then we cannot separate what is good for us from what is good for everyone else.

One area I keep seeing this stupidity is in the area of legal marriage, and I want to address is quickly because I have written recently that I advocate the position that it is the authority of the father of the bride who legitimizes a marriage. I must imagine that many of my fellow pro-marriage, anti-statist cohorts are cheering, “Yeah! Who cares what the state says about marriage?” No, no: We want the state to recognize our marriages, as witnesses, should someone attempt to destroy them.

Anyone who has ever considered the life of a slave is stupid to even ask the question. “Well”, you may say, “we don’t have slaves anymore, so this is a non-issue, that we need state-recognized marriage.” Then consider the life of a soldier, or a government clerk. Consider the position of whomever is the innocent in a divorce; including the children. Is your ex-wife’s family larger or much wealthier than yours? What chance will you have to see your child, under such conditions? As evil as it is that a woman can just fill out the paperwork and move the kids across the country, at least she has to fill out the paperwork. I realize this is an infinitesimally small consolation, but what makes us think that abolition of the paperwork will keep her from moving?

There is no good alternative to a wise and benevolent authority. Since we know that governments are ordained for our discipline, and discipline is for our benefit, then we need to improve if we desire a better authority. The beatings actually will continue until morale improves. Thankfully, we have been born again for a better future, and we have a source of hope.

Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ! According to his great mercy, he has caused us to be born again to a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead, to an inheritance that is imperishable, undefiled, and unfading, kept in heaven for you,who by God’s power are being guarded through faith for a salvation ready to be revealed in the last time. In this you rejoice, though now for a little while, if necessary, you have been grieved by various trials, so that the tested genuineness of your faith—more precious than gold that perishes though it is tested by fire—may be found to result in praise and glory and honor at the revelation of Jesus Christ. Though you have not seen him, you love him. Though you do not now see him, you believe in him and rejoice with joy that is inexpressible and filled with glory, obtaining the outcome of your faith, the salvation of your souls.

It’s ironic that people will chuckle that we get the politicians we deserve, but then bemoan the calamity that befalls us as unfair.

Romans 13 Let every person be subject to the governing authorities. For there is no authority except from God, and those that exist have been instituted by God. Therefore whoever resists the authorities resists what God has appointed, and those who resist will incur judgment. For rulers are not a terror to good conduct, but to bad. Would you have no fear of the one who is in authority? Then do what is good, and you will receive his approval, for he is God’s servant for your good. But if you do wrong, be afraid, for he does not bear the sword in vain. For he is the servant of God, an avenger who carries out God’s wrath on the wrongdoer. Therefore one must be in subjection, not only to avoid God’s wrath but also for the sake of conscience. For because of this you also pay taxes, for the authorities are ministers of God, attending to this very thing. Pay to all what is owed to them: taxes to whom taxes are owed, revenue to whom revenue is owed, respect to whom respect is owed, honor to whom honor is owed.

If we do not respect the authority of the state to witness–NOT authorize–our marriages, they will surely ignore them. What is good for the sinful Christian goose, is good for the whole fallen gander.

A Series of Negatives on Inherent Unfairness, Part III

The story of Creation and the Garden of Eden is well-travelled ground for the Christians (and some non-Christians) in the Manosphere. I want to discuss an aspect of it that I have never realized before last night, and have never seen discussed–though I might have just missed it. Each part is a really short bit that isn’t talked about in scripture explicitly, but is unavoidable once you see it between the lines. By unavoidable, I do not mean that I have the answer, but that it is a question that should definitely be asked.

One of the ways in which the stories of the Bible, and the parables of Jesus, are so good is because they are the field in which new treasures are always being found.

44 “The kingdom of heaven is like treasure hidden in a field, which a man found and covered up. Then in his joy he goes and sells all that he has and buys that field.”

This is part III of a series in digging for what is under the surface. I was going to do several parts, but I have some things I want to say, and I need to get through this so I can build upon it. You can find the other parts here: Part I, Part II

I have to do a quick review for my own sake, so I might as well post it here. In Genesis chapter 1 we have God, alone, and without anyone to prompt Him but Himself, He sets about creating a world. It is dark. He creates light, night and day, atmosphere, oceans, stars, land, plants, sea-life, birds, and the animals. After each one is made–and never before–He says “It is good.”

He makes man in His/Their own image, and does not say they are good until they are given a job. The very thing that is most like Him, is good only in that it has submission to His order and purposes; authority over the everything that was created; respect for the process of order itself.

28 And God blessed them. And God said to them, “Be fruitful and multiply and fill the earth and subdue it, and have dominion over the fish of the sea and over the birds of the heavens and over every living thing that moves on the earth.” 29 And God said, “Behold, I have given you every plant yielding seed that is on the face of all the earth, and every tree with seed in its fruit. You shall have them for food. 30 And to every beast of the earth and to every bird of the heavens and to everything that creeps on the earth, everything that has the breath of life, I have given every green plant for food.” And it was so. 31 And God saw everything that he had made, and behold, it was very good. And there was evening and there was morning, the sixth day.

Notice that almost every sentence beings with “And”. It’s a continuation of ideas. Man, being finite, can only hear or see one thing at a time–like a string–, but the conjunction “And” shows us this is a continuous revelation; each part tied up not only after the other, but alongside it. We read it as a string of text, but it’s actually a knot of authority, responsibility, and respect. You can’t have one without the other.

What is being described? It’s picture of the family. Though, we don’t see it directly; we experience it in the reverse, as the negative of the picture of family. We feel the pain of absence and disorder. What we experience is the shape of the hole where authority, responsibility, and respect should be.

  • We suffer for the lack of authority from fathers in provisioning and leading their families.
  • We suffer the lack of responsibility from mothers to continue in their marriages, and in child-rearing.
  • We suffer the lack of respect from our children for what authority and responsibility have provided them; which is life itself.

This phenomenon is not limited to the immediate family (profiting when we accept the whole knot of authority, responsibility, and respect, or suffering when we reject it); it also happens on an internal level, inside us. It is true in the extended family, as well. It affects our churches, our governments, and even our businesses. This knot of authority, responsibility, and respect that began long before us and our families, continues through us, and goes on into infinity at the consummation of mankind with Christ. This knot is what ties us all together, and to God.

The second thing that really strikes me is that good-ness–or fair-ness–is not the reason for us to be stewards of God’s creation, to manage the animals, or to eat. We are given no reason but His desire.

In other words: to ask the question of something so basic as, “What right do I have to manage the animals?” (which is easily answered, given man’s easy ability to corral, raise, or destroy them), is to miss the point, or the mark.

The definition of “sin” is: “to be outside”, or “to be without”. Sin means “to miss the point”. Sin separates us from God not because we don’t see things the way He does, or because we have made Him mad, but because we have cut ourselves out of the knot of authority, responsibility, and respect. We have resorted to judging for ourselves what is good. Even God does not judge the goodness of a thing until He has seen it–even if He made it! We are trying to create our own knot with an extraordinarily tiny amount of finite string.

What happens when we cut a section of string out of a knot? Given enough time: the whole thing unravels.