A Series of Negatives on Inherent Unfairness, Part VII

The story of Creation and the Garden of Eden is well-travelled ground for the Christians (and some non-Christians) in the Manosphere. I want to discuss an aspect of it that I have never realized before last night, and have never seen discussed–though I might have just missed it. Each part is a really short bit that isn’t talked about in scripture explicitly, but is unavoidable once you see it between the lines. By unavoidable, I do not mean that I have the answer, but that it is a question that should definitely be asked.

One of the ways in which the stories of the Bible, and the parables of Jesus, are so good is because they are the field in which new treasures are always being found.

44 “The kingdom of heaven is like treasure hidden in a field, which a man found and covered up. Then in his joy he goes and sells all that he has and buys that field.”

This is part VI of a series in digging for what is under the surface. I was going to do several parts, but I have some things I want to say, and I need to get through this so I can build upon it. You can find the other parts here: Part IPart IIPart IIIPart IVPart V, Part VI.

In Part VI I did a pretty comprehensive review of all the previous from Genesis 1:1 to the end of Genesis 2. It wouldn’t be a bad idea to re-read it since I’ve taken more than two weeks to finish up this last section. When you’ve finished that: prepare yourself for some very pro Game. Bear in mind: this is my educated guess based on my experiences of women.

3:1 Now the serpent was more crafty than any other beast of the field that the Lord God had made.

He said to the woman, “Did God actually say, ‘You shall not eat of any tree in the garden’?”

What an opener! First of all: the serpent doesn’t qualify itself. It doesn’t introduce itself. It doesn’t list its merits. It doesn’t show off. It lets her make the assumptions. It leaves it to her to qualify him. It’s her business to wonder who it is to ask. Because the serpent asks her a question though, her mind is likely divided; trying to simultaneously trying to perform several emotional and logical responses. If the serpent had asked this of Adam, Adam probably would have short-circuited the serpent’s routine by asking for the serpent’s qualifications. Men, intuitively understanding authority, would have would have cut first to wondering under what authority the serpent was operating, and not moved on until authority was established.

It’s also an outstanding Neg. In one sentence it both insinuates that it is a strange phenomenon that God would prohibit her from something that might be available to others, and implies that maybe she is not good enough to eat <i>any</i> of the fruit–which would have the effect of raising a shaky sense of defensiveness.

Even the purely logical responses are divided again because she can obviously eat any fruit in the Garden except from the fruit of the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil–so a simple answer there. However; the prohibition against that tree would weigh heavily in her mind because the repercussions are so severe.

As a little recap and exposition, here is a list of at least some of the things probably simultaneously going through Eve’s mind:

  1. Who is this serpent?
  2. Why is it talking to me?
  3. Which fruits can I eat?
  4. Which fruit can’t I eat?
  5. Why ask such a nonsensical question?
  6. Is it nonsensical?
  7. Who can eat the prohibited fruit?
  8. Why can’t I eat the prohibited fruit?
  9. Am I good enough?
  10. What is that fruit, anyway?

All of which, leaves very little mental energy to make a good judgment about the situation as a whole. Contrary to what you may have heard: women are no better at multitasking than men. Some folks are better than others, but both sexes just trade off the finite amount of resources of the brain, like processing a queue of tasks to be done. As I said above, what the man would have done before even taking on this problem is establish the authority of the questioner. It’s a great strategy to preserve resources for the things that are really important; like work, or sex. Women tend to lack this innate prioritization process because they were purposed to help a man from a submissive position, not at the forefront of the problem.

Finally, the serpent is asking a question to which it already knows the answer; keeping it in its mental territory, and moving her out of hers. The question is fundamentally deceptive in design. On the surface the question is about eating fruit. However; the point is not to get an answer–the serpent has it already–but to use the woman’s lack of sense of the importance of authority and her hypergamous nature to specifically to rev up what PUAs call the woman’s rationalization hamster, i.e., her inability to prioritize wants and needs. It’s an intrinsically deceptive query; which we should expect if we know that the serpent is known for craftiness. It has disarmed Eve’s mind with one question, and now she’s open to suggestion.

I intended to cover a lot more verses, but the more I thought about this (and after getting some expert advice) the more I thought a study of the opening move should stand alone.

Advertisements

8 thoughts on “A Series of Negatives on Inherent Unfairness, Part VII

  1. One Serpent: Many Interpretations.

    Right now, for me: The woman is a mature consenting adult, and thus everything she chooses must be acceptable. That is the modern way of looking at things, and thus the Serpent, is able to appeal to her desires by saying ‘you know you want to’ and ‘if you enjoy it then why not do it’. This reasoning is of course sophistry. The Serpent games Eve. Serpent 1- Women – 0

    [CC: Thanks for visiting! I look for your comments at Dalrock’s.]

  2. Pingback: Random Snippets From the Scenes of My Life (And LInkage) « Breathing Grace

  3. Lots to process here. First, I agree that the approach the serpent used was tailor made to confuse and deflect. Scripture says that we women are more easily deceived and uses this exchange as the classic example.

    Secondly, I agree that multi-tasking is overrated. I have never been good at it. I don’t know very many people who are. My husband is usually very focused on whatever task he is doing at the moment, and he does most things with excellence. I on the other hand, try to juggle lots of balls and usually drop most of them.

    The question is fundamentally deceptive in design. On the surface the question is about eating fruit. However; the point is not to get an answer–the serpent has it already–but to use the woman’s lack of sense of the importance of authority…

    Well said, and very thought-provoking.

  4. A very interesting analysis. One I’ll have to think on for a bit. It is funny I’ve often wondered why she didn’t ask, “who the blazes are you?” and your explanation is very satisfying.

  5. “If the serpent had asked this of Adam, Adam probably would have short-circuited the serpent’s routine by asking for the serpent’s qualifications. Men, intuitively understanding authority, would have would have cut first to wondering under what authority the serpent was operating, and not moved on until authority was established.”

    This is very, very true. Nearly every instance in the Bible where God introduces Himself to a man, the man requires a sign or test by God to verify to whom he is speaking. Even Thomas does this to test Christ’s resurrection. Astonishingly, God always obliges. The Great I Am responds and passes the request of a small and insignificant human. He understands the innate desire of a man to respond a legitimate hierarchy.
    Hell, I even demanded your qualifications to speak with any authority on the topics of Game and Scripture.

    The fact that Eve bypassed any request for identification or sign of authority some would say that it gives women the gift of greater faith, but it also demonstrates a definite weakness in their moral constitution and their susceptibility to deception.

    This is such a brilliant insight.

  6. New to your blog, but I intend to read it all. The Garden is the Key to understanding the relationships, Man to Woman, Man to God, Woman to God, and Man/Woman one flesh to God. I always ask others how Eve could have handled that encounter differently to get a different result. She could have asked God before she acted; she could have asked her Man before she acted, two responses that God endorses in later Scripture. Another very Key understanding is that the encounter with the “Whisperer” takes place when there is no sin in the Man or the Woman. The Man and the Woman are ‘very good’. Sin is not the cause of the action, but the result of the action. Just some thoughts I wish to share.

  7. @Bobbye

    One day I’ll finish this series. At the time I was running out of steam, but I’ve decided to make writing a true priority. My goal is to not let 48 hours pass without a post; just to better establish the habit.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s