Stockholm Syndrome Blues

I have some follow-up news to my report of the Great Sunday Pancake Dust-Up that will be disturbing to many of you.

Tina has–totally unprompted–asked me to read the Bible with her. I said, “Of course.” She is excited.

Liz just brought in a bowl of potatoes that she had been asked to peel and dice, and then asked (grab your girdle, Martha!), “Are these enough?”

What an unjust world. Don’t these kids know what I’ve done to them???

By the way: If you do go back to read “Will You Eat With Me”, you’ll notice there is not a single “sir” uttered by Tina. This is unnatural and goes against all Caldo customs. It’s also a key to understanding why I apprehended the situation the way I did.

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4 thoughts on “Stockholm Syndrome Blues

  1. No, Cane, while I might be in “people who don’t entirely agree” camp, I am not distrubed. Mostly because I think does show that while you are the leader of your house, and everyone knows it, that the pancake story doesn’t end there with you stomping around saying, “I am the father, listen to me.” There’s another side, the part where you love your children, and that drives the authority, and that is known too. Hence Tina wants to learn with you, and Liz is paying more attention. Without that, your children wouldn’t have learned anything. I still don’t agree with the way everything was handled, but I can see the love now. And that’s likely where I was wrong in the first. 🙂

    Maybe you disagree with that, and think it was just the authority and it alone that did the trick. And I don’t feel the urge to fight you tooth and nail on that. 🙂
    But I don’t find this disturbing, I find it comforting, b/c it gives me a better idea of what went on RL than I can find in a blog post. Even a verbatim one.

  2. I think does show that while you are the leader of your house, and everyone knows it, that the pancake story doesn’t end there with you stomping around saying, “I am the father, listen to me.” There’s another side, the part where you love your children, and that drives the authority, and that is known too. Hence Tina wants to learn with you, and Liz is paying more attention. Without that, your children wouldn’t have learned anything.

    Yes.

    Maybe you disagree with that, and think it was just the authority and it alone that did the trick.

    No, we don’t disagree. It was a story about one time I had to draw the whip of authority, and everything worked out well. The foundation of love had to be there. Though, even that is no guarantee. Some people just want to do bad.

  3. I always love it when kids finally get it and want to be good, that is awesome! Love hearing stories about your family. It’s good to have a strong daddy, girls need that protection and loyalty sooo much. I didn’t realize how thankful I was for my father until about ten years after the rebellious teenage years had passed.

  4. Thanks, Sis.

    I think it’s better to think of it in terms of “obedient” vs. “rebellious” rather than “good” vs. “bad”, but I admit that I still fall prey to the habit of the later. My kids are a blessing and a discipline.

    Last night I texted Mrs. Caldo “Tina needs a husband and kids NOW.” She said she’d been thinking the same thing.

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