A Helpmeet Shootable

If you’re bored and looking for another way to measure the media’s purposeful evisceration of womanhood–particularly wifely submission–play a game of His Woman in Film. Here are the rules:

1. Whenever you watch a movie or TV show, grab your His Woman in Film game board.  If you don’t have one, grab some writing utensils and form three columns. Mark the first column Show Title, the second Hero’s Woman, and the third Villain’s Woman. Your game board should look like this:

His Woman in Film

Before I go any further: Already we’re looking at one of the main ways Hollywood and the networks debase marriage. If I had you use the headings Hero’s Wife and Villain’s Woman, then there would not be enough qualifying films to make any thing like a reliable survey. Heroes are usually only allowed wives who are either pushing up daisies, or collecting child support. But, let’s continue with the rules.

2. Write the name of the movie you’re about to watch in the left column.

3. Whenever the hero’s woman undermines, disobeys, argues, mistrusts, or contradicts with the hero: Put a hash mark in the Hero’s Woman column and in-line with the film’s title. Do the same for the Villain’s Woman.

4. At the end of the film, total up the hash marks for each column, and compare to find the winner. Your game board should look something like this:

His Woman in Film Final

If you’re a fan of modern marriage: Congratulations! The Hero’s Woman won by a big, big margin. (It would have been wider, but Kirk Cameron’s character in “Fireproof” played both hero and villain.) The wives romantic interests of the heroes upheld the status quo, and used every opportunity to exert their empowerment to thwart the hero; thereby proving their worthiness as his equal in modern measures of courage and perseverance against The Man. She is The Helpmeet Shootable.

The significant others of the villains are equally instructive: Only bad women reliably submit to their men, and almost always to their own detriment. That’s part of how we are to know they are bad. However; because they are women and moxie is always within their grasp, Moderns should not lose hope. There’s always the breaking point at the climax of the film–a point of treachery that done does-in the dastardly dude–and the villain’s woman is redeemed to her noble and rightful place in the filmament. Or she doesn’t and dies a fool at the hands of her wicked master; thus cleansing all womanhood of wrongdoing.

I’m tempted to suggest that the rest of us fogies take a note from that other paragon of frustrating games, score by lowest number wins, and call the bad as good. But that doesn’t really address the problem, does it? That problem being: We’re grading ourselves according to a sociopathic standard. Doing bad is never good. We should start recognizing that by ceasing to say that it is.

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54 thoughts on “A Helpmeet Shootable

  1. When I saw your scores for Fireproof, I thought you were saying the wife was both Cameron’s woman and the married Doctor’s woman.

  2. @Dalrock

    For a moment I flirted with the idea of creating a drinking game when every time the protagonist’s woman demonstrates independence from the hero, the players take a drink. But then I recalled that people dead of alcohol poisoning can’t read my blog.

    fun for the whole family!

    It certainly is instructive for the whole family. The message that good women show their mettle by “pushing back” upon, and being suspicious of, their man is not lost on children. It’s a function of Zippy’s variant (well, one of his variants) of Positivism: If they don’t show the woman second-guessing her man every moment, then–by the calculus of Medialand–those are moments when the female character is at risk of being seen as a rube or a dupe, and therefore unsympathetic. Sure, she could help the hero kick some ass, but…that’s merely more ass-kicking to the hero’s credit and so why is she even in the movie? The hero will take out the villain anyways because it’s a movie; so what’s her motivation? It mystifies them how will the audience know to root for her if she’s supportive and obedient. No, deciding for herself to support her man is no good. She must decide for herself to rebel and then let him celebrate her victory over him when he takes back anyway.

    This has a couple additional benefits. One is to make every hero’s victory bittersweet; the flavor that puts to rest all notions of the goodness of disparate tastes. Of all the flavors it is the most sociopathic.

    The second is related, and it is to tarnish the image of heroes by saddling them with shrews. Hollywood and TV networks instinctively hate heroes, but the market forces of unenlightened audiences move them to supply heroes anyways. This moves them to make an appeal to an interpretation of God’s law that is written onto even their hearts; a satanic and damning interpretation for punishment.

  3. “Whenever the hero’s woman undermines, disobeys, argues, mistrusts, or contradicts with the hero: Put a hash mark in the Hero’s Woman column and in-line with the film’s title. Do the same for the Villain’s Woman.”

    In films and movies, whenever a woman does this usually two things happen:
    1) The man turns out to be evil, annoying, or with bad intentions. Thus going back and justifying the woman’s actions, even though all of these could not have been known beforehand, and the woman’s actions almost certainly played a role in exacerbating it.

    2) The man turns out to be good and amazing, in which case the woman is instantly forgiven for all that she has done and everything will be alright. He was strong enough to handle it anyways.

    If you think about it, the message it sends is that there are no consequences for this sort of behavior. If her actions sussed out an evil or weak man then they were justified. If the man turned out to be good or strong, her actions were useful for confirming this and once again justified.

    If you think about it, does that not sound similar to the manosphere’s definition of a sh!t test?

    Interesting that film and television is essentially promoting this.

    I wonder what ever happened to being good for the sake of being good? It seems to be replaced by you can be bad if it leads to good situations.

  4. I’ve only watched the first two seasons, but the wife of the main FBI guy in “White Collar” – he isn’t really the hero, the “bad boy” is the hero, but anyway – she stands out as a character on a modern TV series dramatically: she is pleasant, supportive, not demanding. Childless marriage, but still, just in terms of projecting a pleasantness to be around she is quite a standout.

    Great game.

  5. Great post and idea Cane. Works for movies or TV shows. Heck, its a great learning tool when you think about it- perfect for educating the children about how messed up the culture is.

    @ Zippy

    I watched a bit of that show when it first came out. Liked it, and yes, I remember that the wife of the FBI agent (who is a hero/sidekick combo) was a far cry from how most wives are portrayed.

    Perhaps that would make for a good post- to comb through the sludge of popular culture and find examples of good wives.

  6. @Zippy

    I’ve only watched the first two seasons, but the wife of the main FBI guy in “White Collar” – he isn’t really the hero, the “bad boy” is the hero, but anyway – she stands out as a character on a modern TV series dramatically: she is pleasant, supportive, not demanding. Childless marriage, but still, just in terms of projecting a pleasantness to be around she is quite a standout.

    Is “White Collar” an entertaining show? I recall the previews struck me as boring, and I easily tire of the good bad guy unless it is done well. However; one of the casualties of being unusually critical of shows is that previews aren’t made with me in mind. That can be misleading. The previews for “Firefly” were horrible to me, and so I didn’t watch it until long after the show had been cancelled.

    I do have an affinity for the bad good guy, though; Raylan Givens, John Luther, Lucius Verenus and Titus Pullo (one man with two bodies)…Darth Vader. Not to be confused with someone like Vic Mackey, or Walter White, whom I could not stand.

    @DG

    Thanks!

    I’d like to see your findings. I have an example of a good role model for wives–especially in conflict!–queued up in the posts.

  7. By the way: Helpmeet shootable? In the context of films and betrayal? That was the rare triple-threat of puns. And filmament alluding to two types of stars was just…inspired. I normally wouldn’t take credit for such good work, but I don’t know who else to give it to. What can I say? I was unconscious from the line last night.

    shakes hat at the audience

  8. A Helpmeet Shootable

    🙂 . I like the title.

    Luther was a favorite of mine. And his wife was a pitiful character indeed. The only woman he was involved in who had any faith in him consistently was a sociopath criminal. Go figure.

  9. @Elspeth

    The only woman he was involved in who had any faith in him consistently was a sociopath criminal.

    I dig Alice Morgan, but because I speak from within the Tao I know that is wrong of me.

    We just finished the 3rd (and I believe final) season last night. A week previous we watched “The Adventurer: The Curse of the Midas Box” with the kids. It was this movie which prompted the post. I told my girls to pay attention to the fact that the only woman in the film to support her man was Lena Headey’s character. The mother of the main character is an out-and-out equal in position with her husband both at home and work, and they die shortly after the film starts anyways.

  10. You are a punny guy, Cane.

    I watched the two seasons of WC mostly because others liked it at the time. It was mildly entertaining; but that one character (she is a bit overweight but quite pretty) just radiates warm agreeable femininity in a way that you rarely see on screen. I have no idea if they ruined her in later seasons, and the show itself didn’t hook me the way a few others have.

    I have watched all of Justified on my own impetus though, I’m afraid.

  11. I just thought of an exception… sort of. In “The Walking Dead”, Rick is the hero, and his wife is – predictably – terrible. But she also quickly became the most hated character on the show, and she suffers the most dire of consequences for her terribleness.

  12. @Zippy

    Don’t forget to tip the bartender. My man RayRay does a heck of a job, folks.

    I have watched all of Justified on my own impetus though, I’m afraid.

    Justified is superb. I’m always one season behind though because I only watch what is on Netflix or Amazon Prime. I highly recommend Luther to you, if you like modern forms of noir such as Justified. It’s very well written. Decidely less puns than I provide, but still well-written. All for the best I suppose.

  13. @Oscar

    I just thought of an exception… sort of. In “The Walking Dead”, Rick is the hero, and his wife is – predictably – terrible. But she also quickly became the most hated character on the show, and she suffers the most dire of consequences for her terribleness.

    I haven’t watched The Walking Dead, despite Empath’s several beseechings. I’ve seen similar things before. I think the important thing to remember is that they do not like to show submissive wives. I don’t even think they know how.

  14. I dig Alice Morgan

    My husband did too. She was an engaging character.

    It was mildly entertaining; but that one character (she is a bit overweight but quite pretty) just radiates warm agreeable femininity in a way that you rarely see on screen.

    I didn’t watch White Collar (boring) but I have seen about 2 episodes.The woman who plays that role of the pleasant. supportive wife, was the star of a show that was popular when I was finishing high school I believe, Saved by the Bell.

  15. @Oscar

    I just thought of an exception… sort of. In “The Walking Dead”, Rick is the hero, and his wife is – predictably – terrible. But she also quickly became the most hated character on the show, and she suffers the most dire of consequences for her terribleness.

    My wife said they called the wife whorie (a play on Lauri) on the fan sites. This was a rare case of taking the relationship drama/not happy game too far for even modern women to stomach. It raised their anti slut shields. Her husband is too good a man and she crossed some serious boundaries.

  16. @Cane

    “I think the important thing to remember is that they do not like to show submissive wives. I don’t even think they know how.”

    I think the only place to watch a submissive wife on contemporary TV is “19 Kids and Counting”.

    @Dalrock

    “My wife said they called the wife whorie (a play on Lauri) on the fan sites. This was a rare case of taking the relationship drama/not happy game too far for even modern women to stomach. It raised their anti slut shields. Her husband is too good a man and she crossed some serious boundaries.”

    Heh! Whorie. That’s classic. I’m not sure why the show makes Lori such a terrible person. She’s a much more sympathetic character in the comic book. I think maybe they wanted to soften the blow when she finally got eaten, but they overdid the role to the point it wasn’t believable when Rick mourned for her.

    As for Rick: he was an extremely rare case of a heroic married father in popular fiction. Then they killed off his wife. I can’t say I feel bad about that.

  17. Lori was abhorrent, with Andrea a close second, except Andrea was dumb to boot in addition to being slutty.

    Good that they killed those terrible characters off. It took me a while to get used to that sjow. It’s gruesome! But my husband kept watching it. So I watched a couple of episodes and got sucked in by the characters.

    I still recoil and turn my head on lots of the zombie scenes. Never have gotten used to it, which amuses my husband.

  18. Re: Justified, I like it that skinny sharpshooter Raylan gets his ass kicked every time he gets in a fistfight. The Walton Goggins character Boyd Crowder is all over the place – he is more or less a different character every season. And Raylan’s ex is just vile, the less screen time she gets the better.

    I thought the first season of Fargo was very well executed. Martin Freemen takes the “red pill” all the way to its natural conclusion.

    I’ll have to give Luther a look.

  19. Excellent game. I’ll also have to give “Justified” another go. I did not like the pilot at all but maybe I missed something.

    As to Rick’s wife, I am bit surprised by the reaction here. She does sleep with another man but the assumption is that her husband is dead (the seducer having lied). While she does try to avoid telling her husband she does tell him long before she dies and makes clear that she is unsure of the father of her child. She actively supports Rick’s decisions and quashes female mumbling that would undermine her husband.

    The only time she is disloyal is when she reacts negatively to a justifiable homicide. For that her husband brutally (but justifiably) rejects her. She however repents and tries to win him back before she dies. Which leads to him feeling guilty.

  20. @ZIppy

    I like it that skinny sharpshooter Raylan gets his ass kicked every time he gets in a fistfight.

    Haha! He does, doesn’t he? I like it that he doesn’t let that stop him. He gets his heart kicked by every woman, too.

    Walton Goggins character Boyd Crowder is all over the place – he is more or less a different character every season.

    My view of Boyd Crowder is that he is supposed to be what would Raylan be without the law. They went to school together. Worked the same mine together. Their daddies were criminals together… In a few episodes, Raylan is even explicit about that: He hangs onto the law, or he is lost. Boyd rejects that so he’s fluttered about by every wind that blows through Kentucky.

    Raylans ex is trash. Well cast and wardrobed, though. She always looks like a skeezer.

    I’ll check out Fargo. Is it based off the movie?

    @GKC

    I’ll also have to give “Justified” another go. I did not like the pilot at all but maybe I missed something.

    Do. It’s Southern noir. Personally, I was hooked from the opening scene when Raylan blasts the crime boss like he said he would. Mon ami!

    She does sleep with another man but the assumption is that her husband is dead (the seducer having lied). While she does try to avoid telling her husband she does tell him long before she dies

    Well, that seals the deal: I won’t be watching “The Walking Dead”. A similar storyline in “Rome” made me livid. That may be the result of some problem between the LCD and the couch, but the science isn’t confirmed yet…

    I always feel like I should warn people about Rome. It’s very graphic; at least NC-17. Best show I ever saw though. Hands down. The residual anger from Lucius’ wife was more dangerous for me than the nudity or violence, but you have been warned.

  21. Why? She thinks her husband is dead. Per your earlier essay about doing right even when angry I think this qualifies. The avoidance is obvious embarrassment. Her husbands best friend reported him dead.

  22. I’m honestly blown away at how much you guys watch ‘tee vee’. Not only why but how you actually have the time.

  23. @GKC

    The problem I referred to that exists between the LCD and the couch is me; my mind, with all its biases. I wasn’t making a judgment call about the content or the characters themselves, but my reaction to them.

    It’s no loss to me. Zombies haven’t appealed to me since their apex, which was Resident Evil 4 back in 2005.

  24. @NautiGal

    I’m honestly blown away at how much you guys watch ‘tee vee’. Not only why but how you actually have the time.

    Mrs. Caldo and I make it a point to shove off the kids every night and watch something together. It’s art. Some of it’s good and some of it is bad, but it’s an opportunity to think. As you might imagine from my commentary here: Watching TV or movies with me isn’t your parents’ TV watching experience. That took Mrs. Caldo some years to adjust.

    Streaming video and full season availability makes this easier as long as you’re willing to wait a year. We focus on a series at a time.

  25. @GKChesterton

    The fans’ distaste for Lori isn’t about her screwing Shane. That was understandable. She thought her husband was dead and the world was ending, so she clung to a tough dude to take care of her and her son. I think we all get that.

    You’re also right that she tried to salvage her marriage in the 3rd season, but as I recall, she spent the first two seasons undermining Rick and making his job – leading and protecting their little group of survivors – a lot harder that necessary (as if what was necessary wasn’t already near-impossible). Her attempts in season 3 were too little, too late. On top of that, she lost their son, Carl, at least once per episode. One would think a mother would place keeping track of her son higher on her priority list during the apocalypse.

    Side note: I remember reading an article about season 1 in which the female writer complained that even during the zombie apocalypse sexism was alive and well because the men mostly took on the roles of provider/protector while the women mostly stuck to domestic chores.

    Reading that, I thought “Du-uh! That’s what people do when survival is at stake! Modern notions about sexism are luxuries only Westerners are wealthy enough to afford, and only for the last 60 years or so.”

    I’ve noticed, however, that the writers have tried to make things more egalitarian as the show progressed.

  26. @ nautigal:

    I can list everything we watch in less than 10 shows, and like Cane mentioned, watching stuff after the fact, with fewer commercials, cuts the time down considerably.

    I basically watch whatever my husband watches. And he is very particular about what he watches because he doesn’t have a lot of time for it.

  27. @Oscar

    The fans’ distaste for Lori isn’t about her screwing Shane. That was understandable. She thought her husband was dead and the world was ending, so she clung to a tough dude to take care of her and her son. I think we all get that.

    I think you and GKC are being far too charitable towards Lori. It takes a lot to trigger the modern woman’s slut revulsion, and yet she managed to do so. Here are the issues as I recall them (obviously plot spoilers if you haven’t seen the first parts of the series):

    1) She is not shown as mourning Rick’s death before jumping immediately to another man. One could deconstruct the plot and infer that she must have waited at least a few weeks, but for the women in the audience I think the lack of her being seen as clearly mourning is something they hold against her.
    2) Her affair with Shane is illicit. This isn’t a marriage, or even a “camp marriage”. This is her sneaking off into the woods to get some action with her dead husbands former deputy/friend when she thinks no one is looking.
    3) She continues the deception even after Rick returns, although she does put an end to her booty calls with Shane. By the time she comes clean several months later, Rick had figured it out long ago.
    4) She does just enough to keep Shane in her orbit even after Rick is back, sending carefully calculated mixed messages.
    5) She doesn’t know who her baby daddy is, in large part because of her secrecy about the affair when her husband returned. It was simply out with the old er, man, in with the new…
    6) In large part because of item #4, Shane lures Rick into a field at night to murder him. When Rick gets the upper hand and kills Shane instead, instead of rejoicing that her husband escaped murder at the hands of her booty call, she is furious.

  28. Justified is superb.

    I wouldn’t go that far. I hope they bring back Mr. Limehouse, there’s something not finished with his storyline. Oh, and doesn’t the whole Ava shooting Bowman at the supper table kind of – you know – blow away your whole helpmeet shootable premise?

    So, I see what you’re getting at, but what about the fact that it’s easier to be bad than good? You’re talking about women participating in and facilitating sin, the women of the good guys and the bad guys both. I mean “do him good” doesn’t translate as “write a bunch of hot checks and rob the liquor store, because I’m so submissive” does it? I’m not following how being a criminal accomplice = helpmeet.

    As for Raylan, he wants to be the good guy AND the bad guy, so he attracts wackos. I don’t really think you can get a fair sample on that show. Plus those people aren’t even married so it doesn’t count.

  29. @Velvet

    Oh, and doesn’t the whole Ava shooting Bowman at the supper table kind of – you know – blow away your whole helpmeet shootable premise?

    No. It upholds it. Bowman Crowder was a bad guy. She was (as far as we know) a good wife to him even while he mistreated her…right up until her one big betrayal.

    So, I see what you’re getting at, but what about the fact that it’s easier to be bad than good? You’re talking about women participating in and facilitating sin, the women of the good guys and the bad guys both. I mean “do him good” doesn’t translate as “write a bunch of hot checks and rob the liquor store, because I’m so submissive” does it? I’m not following how being a criminal accomplice = helpmeet.

    You’re all over the place in this part because you’re trying to judge whether the wife is equal to the husband in “real” sin like robbing liquor stores; the very trap that prompted this post. Don’t be distracted from the reality of the sin of usurpation, betrayal, and rebellion by wives.

    Whether she helps him rob liquor stores or not is beside the point. Of course robbery is sinful.

    But does she let his house fall into disorder, or does she talk back, or does she embarrass him in front of his colleagues, or does she undermine his confidence, or does she withhold sex from him, or does she neglect their children for a career, or does she give him ultimatums, or does she pick fights to start an argument that is really about something else? You get the picture. Villains’ wives almost never are portrayed doing those things. Their only betrayal is as a final act because he’s mean to her, or betrayed her.

    See, robbing liquor stores ain’t stuff that actual wives relate to. Most of them never have to worry about such things; nor do the writers have that expectation. Actual wives relate to the wife of the hero, and that wife lets the house fall into disorder, and talks back, and embarrasses him in front of his colleagues, and undermines his confidence, and withholds sex, and neglects their children for a career, and gives him ultimatums, and picks fights to start an argument that is really about something else.

    The lesson being: Actual wives’ behavior is consistent with the behavior or heroic wives; so rebellion is what healthy wives practice. A submissive wife is a sign of a villainy, and it’s going to cost her if she doesn’t change her ways.

    As for Raylan, he wants to be the good guy AND the bad guy, so he attracts wackos. I don’t really think you can get a fair sample on that show. Plus those people aren’t even married so it doesn’t count.

    I would argue that he knows his nature is to be bad, so he clings to the law (Not to be confused with The Law.). Police work is his sacrament.

    @Dalrock

    6) In large part because of item #4, Shane lures Rick into a field at night to murder him. When Rick gets the upper hand and kills Shane instead, instead of rejoicing that her husband escaped murder at the hands of her booty call, she is furious.

    That seals it. Her name’s Whorie.

  30. @Cane

    It’s no loss to me. Zombies haven’t appealed to me since their apex, which was Resident Evil 4 back in 2005.

    I’m pretty much zombied out too. The show does have some excellent characters though. Two of my favorites are Rick and his Colt Python. Yeah it isn’t practical for zombies, but if loving the .357 is wrong, I don’t want to be right. There definitely is an Arthurian theme with Rick (Arthur), the python (Excalibur) and Shane (Lancelot). Whorie of course plays the cuckolding Guenevere.

    The video below should give you a sense for Rick’s character without having to suffer through the actual show. Check out 23 seconds in when Rick is riding into Atlanta:

  31. You’re all over the place in this part

    Me? No way.

    I would argue that he knows his nature is to be bad, so he clings to the law (Not to be confused with The Law.). Police work is his sacrament.

    I would argue he uses police work in order to exercise his nature – to get women and hang around with bad guys – rather than subdue it. Considering his routine participation in criminal behavior he seems pretty comfortable with that part of himself. Plausible deniability, since he can’t thug it up as effortlessly as Boyd, but his only sacrament is hooking up with one Sally Sociopath or another. The subtext of his fixation on Boyd is that Boyd’s got the psycho-est girlfriend evah!

    She was (as far as we know) a good wife to him even while he mistreated her…right up until her one big betrayal.

    rofl.

    Don’t be distracted from the reality of the sin of usurpation, betrayal, and rebellion by wives.

    I do see what you’re saying, I’m saying that usurpation, betrayal, and rebellion can be couched – are often couched – in complicity. Okay, so no robbing the liquor store – we can use real things, like contracepting, and skipping Mass, and lying to the IRS? Those are things women do as “help” to their husbands all the time, because it’s easier to be bad than good.

    And come on – Boyd, for example, doesn’t have the moral capacity to know he SHOULD be embarrassed that his woman runs a brothel. She IS making a fool of him, betraying him, etc. It’s infuriating – I actually feel sorry for him sometimes she’s so awful.

    I’m using Ava as an example because – show! – but just because Bonnie made Clyde a sandwich and gave him a back rub doesn’t make her a “help” in the grand scheme.

  32. @Velvet

    I would argue he uses police work in order to exercise his nature – to get women and hang around with bad guys – rather than subdue it. Considering his routine participation in criminal behavior he seems pretty comfortable with that part of himself. Plausible deniability, since he can’t thug it up as effortlessly as Boyd, but his only sacrament is hooking up with one Sally Sociopath or another. The subtext of his fixation on Boyd is that Boyd’s got the psycho-est girlfriend evan!

    Ha. No. Sally Sociopaths are his drug.

    I’m using Ava as an example because – show! – but just because Bonnie made Clyde a sandwich and gave him a back rub doesn’t make her a “help” in the grand scheme.

    There is no grand scheme for consideration. The only scheme is their marriage; their relationship to each other. Ava absolutely is a better helpmeet. (I’ve only seen through season 5.) Does that mean she’s not an accomplice, or that she’s excused because during the course of her complicity she is a helpmeet? No, of course she would not excused. At the same time: She wouldn’t be punished for being a helpmeet either. God’s not going to say to her: “Why didn’t you stop him?”, or “Why didn’t you stand up to him?” That’s not her place. God said so.

    As I said to James in the other thread: I know my taxes go to support abortion. Does that make me complicit? No. That is there business. Ava fixing Boyd’s lunch between drug deals doesn’t make her complicit either, and it doesn’t detract from her success as a subordinate and a helpmeet either.

    Right about now, your mind is likely blown and you’re probably thinking: BUT SHE KILLS PEOPLE AND RUNS A WHOREHOUSE SHE CAN’T BE GOOD AND SHE’S BEING NOT-GOOD RIGHT THERE WITH BOYD AND A GOOD WIFE WOULDN’T SHOOT PEOPLE AND PIMP AND… Yeah, those are bad. But if she’s submissive to Boyd she’s still a better helpmeet than Hollywood chooses to model for heroes’ wives.

    Submissive wives can win their husbands over without a word. Don’t blame me. I just work here.

  33. @Dalrock

    “I think you and GKC are being far too charitable towards Lori. It takes a lot to trigger the modern woman’s slut revulsion, and yet she managed to do so. Here are the issues as I recall them…”

    Excellent points, including stuff I’d forgotten. Or maybe I’m mixing up the TV show and comic book. Like I said, Lori in the comic is a much more sympathetic character. She doesn’t undermine Rick, or string Shane along. Shane attempts to murder Rick right away, but Rick prevails.

    Lori’s death in the comic is also much more dignified, though even more tragic. She gets shot during the Governor’s assault on the prison, and baby Judith dies in the process.

    Maybe that’s why the show’s writers made her so awful. Maybe they didn’t think TV viewers would stick with a show that featured a death that was as emotionally shocking as Lori’s death in the comic.

    “Two of my favorites are Rick and his Colt Python. Yeah it isn’t practical for zombies, but if loving the .357 is wrong, I don’t want to be right. There definitely is an Arthurian theme with Rick (Arthur), the python (Excalibur) and Shane (Lancelot). Whorie of course plays the cuckolding Guenevere.”

    Ha! I never thought of that! I saw the first season as a western set in the zombie apocalypse, but the Arthurian angle makes a lot of sense. And yes, the Colt rocks.

  34. @Dalrock,

    I’m going to have to respectfully disagree. The first rule of Man being do not listen overmuch to Woman. The mass I believe protests a bit too much in this case. The fellow under discussion is a close friend to start and rescues her and her son and thereafter effectively adopts her son. There is no marriage because in the minds of the characters as there is no State to perform such a thing. For her to refuse the advance would be Saintly in the extreme.

    I mean some of the fans discontent was her “saddling” Rick with a second child rather than killing it. Hardly a good-guy position.

    If however we use Cane’s game she comes out way ahead. On the whole she supports and she’s _married_ to the good guy. The show also pointedly makes clear sex roles even going so far as to joke about them in the first episode. The men are by far the hunters and the women gather and until Lesbian-Black-Ninja-Chick appears are compared to things like say, Firefly, domestic role models.

    You are correct though about the Arthurian undertones. There is the developing Gwen (beautiful maiden enchanted by the wrong man), Lancelot (Fearsome warrior overcome by his own abilities and plunged into darkness and death), Excalibur, and more than a little soft-Mordred in the son who is being written as a future killing machine.

    I should also note I am not a zombie fan, in fact I tend to strongly dislike zombie shows, but I think _on the whole_ (again minus the FAR worse lesbian-ninjas coupling introduced to appease the Whorie howling fans) is a good show.

    I’ve been meaning to watch Rome…but…it strikes me as depressing and drenched in NC-17. I still the Longmire is the best thing out right now on TV. Though it loses, because: wife dead. Though the second love interest doesn’t fight the hero much and only gets heated when jealousy is introduced. She even regularly bakes for him.

    All above said with the Netflix “one season at least behind” caveat.

  35. @Nauti,

    I think most of us watch little TV compared to the general population. We’re all Netflix folks. We watch one full show and maybe one comedy a night. I have my evening beverage during the serious show and then enjoy the comedy to wash off the day (I didn’t used to like comedies…then I got old and started needing them). And that’s if I watch.

    Caveat Emptor: I have been known to binge when a new season of Top Gear UK comes out…

  36. @GKC

    I’ve been meaning to watch Rome…but…it strikes me as depressing and drenched in NC-17.

    If you want to see (what I believe is) a good representation of the profound effect Christianity has had on the world: Rome is a good place. That’s what smacked me every time I watched it.

    There is full-frontal nudity in two out of three episodes…perhaps more, and of men and women alike. The intercourse is very suggestive, but not explicit explicit, if you catch my drift, and none of it romantic in the usual sense. A Berlin love track over them would seem wildly out of place. The violence is harsh, quick, and bloody like a Scorsese film. Mrs. Caldo and I watched it together. I find that’s a good ruler for me to use in deciding what I should or should not watch.

    It was created by John Milius, the director of Conan the Barbarian, the writer of Red Dawn and Dirty Harry, and a founder of Ultimate Fighting Championship; among others things.

  37. @GKC

    I’m going to have to respectfully disagree. The first rule of Man being do not listen overmuch to Woman. The mass I believe protests a bit too much in this case. The fellow under discussion is a close friend to start and rescues her and her son and thereafter effectively adopts her son. There is no marriage because in the minds of the characters as there is no State to perform such a thing. For her to refuse the advance would be Saintly in the extreme.

    As I mentioned, it wasn’t even a “camp marriage”. It was done in secret, which is why she thought she could keep it from Rick when he joined their camp. Even the official character page at AMC calls it an affair. Also, you overlook the rest, how she kept Shane in her orbit and how she was angry instead of rejoicing when Rick survived Shanes resulting attempt to murder him.

    http://www.amctv.com/shows/the-walking-dead/cast/lori-grimes

  38. @GKC

    The men are by far the hunters and the women gather and until Lesbian-Black-Ninja-Chick appears are compared to things like say, Firefly, domestic role models.

    Funny. Mishan is one of the better female characters. She is the antifeminist. Capable but silent. Never boasting, and not demanding anything, just doing what needs to be done. She is much like Daryl. She is the opposite of Blondie, who always boasts, demands to be taken seriously, then shoots their own guy out of arrogance, sides with the enemy, etc. I don’t know where the lesbo charge comes from though. Is it because she is competent and doesn’t bitch? If so, I can see that, but she is shown as having been married to a man pre eotwawki.

  39. I just work here

    Hey, you stole my line.

    But if she’s submissive to Boyd she’s still a better helpmeet than Hollywood chooses to model for heroes’ wives.

    No, she’s no “better”. They’re all equally destructive. I don’t see how she can be painted as a Murderous Pimp with a Heart (though that’s not the relevant body part in their relationship) of Gold, and still be a helpmeet. Don’t add up, and hardly mind blowing. Plus, like I said, they’re not married, and they’re not married – he is not in legitimate authority over her and that is an actual device in their story. Her use of him is not measurable in terms of “help”, she’s agreeable to the extent it serves her. She openly mocks him by way of her behavior.

    There is no grand scheme for consideration.

    There are indeed eternal consequences to capitulating to sin, enticement, and complicity. I don’t see how that’s in question. “Grand scheme” was a poor choice of phrase on my part, sorry.

  40. I could not think of one show I watch where the lead woman would score well on this. I watch more TV than I want to admit to (2 1/2 hrs a day I’d say). That said, just watched Cheaper by the Dozen 2 with the kids and the wife to Steve Martin, while portrayed as the more mature one & smarter, very much had his back, respected and deferred to him. But of course this was 10 years ago & probably safe due to the fact he played the good, but “goofy” dad. There is one scene where the kids undercut him en masse, but never the mom. I was pleasantly surprised.

  41. @Velvet

    No, she’s no “better”. They’re all equally destructive.

    Yes, but while Ava is being equally destructive from a grand scheme view, in the marriage model view she’s a better helpmeet while being otherwise equally destructive. That’s what this post is about.

    I don’t see how she can be painted as a Murderous Pimp with a Heart (though that’s not the relevant body part in their relationship) of Gold, and still be a helpmeet.

    I didn’t even imply such a thing. Her heart might be full of asps for all we know. She still models better wifely submission than Raylan’s ex-wife.

  42. @GK Chesterton

    “I’ve been meaning to watch Rome…but…it strikes me as depressing and drenched in NC-17. I still the Longmire is the best thing out right now on TV. Though it loses, because: wife dead. Though the second love interest doesn’t fight the hero much and only gets heated when jealousy is introduced. She even regularly bakes for him.”

    I recently discovered Longmire in Netflix while my wife was away helping her sister recover from knee surgery. There wasn’t much to do once the kids were in bed.

    Longmire is good TV. The main character is honorable, but still flawed, which is realistic. I also really like how Walt and Branch’s relationship evolved over the first two seasons. It’s not perfect, of course. There are some moral issues, and I seriously doubt there is so much serious crime in Wyoming, but as far as fiction goes, it’s the best I’ve found on Netflix. Also, my wife really enjoys it, which is a big plus. Although, she thinks I’d turn into Walt if she were to die before me. I could go for a cabin in Wyoming!

    I watched the first season of Rome during my first tour in Afghanistan (we don’t have Netflix, we have Haji Flix!), and regretted it. Cane is right that it’s a good representation of what Christians had to deal with back then, and how Christianity changed the world, and artistically it’s excellent, but it was too much for me.

    If you want some excellent non-fiction on Netflix, I highly recommend National Geographic’s “Combat Rescue”. They followed an Air Force Parachute Rescue Jumper (“PJ”) unit through their deployment to Kandahar province.

    “Restrepo” is also outstanding. It’s from my first deployment to Afghanistan with the 173rd Airborne (different battalion, same brigade). I couldn’t watch more than half of it, but what I did see was some of the best documentary work I’ve ever seen.

  43. Oscar,

    I’ll have to check out Longmire. As you say “Combat Rescue” is very good. My father flew CSAR in Viet Nam so I grew up on that kind of thing. If you’ve seen it, I would be curious what your thoughts are on the other Nat Geo Afghanistan series “Battleground Afghanistan”. Likewise if you have any thoughts on “Alpha Company Iraq Diary”.

    Restrepo is superb, right down to the cinematography of the belt fed weapon shining in the sunlight.

  44. That said, just watched Cheaper by the Dozen 2 with the kids and the wife to Steve Martin, while portrayed as the more mature one & smarter, very much had his back, respected and deferred to him.

    Too bad it was an awful movie.

  45. The new “Fargo” was awesome, better than the original in my opinion. Still need to see the last three episodes though.

    Original was good but highly overrated. The accents were iconic and supposedly funny/endearing, but they just annoyed the heck out of me. For whatever reason I didn’t think the new one was as bad in that regard…possibly because they said “Yoh” way less often, thank goodness.

  46. …Of course, Sherlock will always and forever be my favorite. “The Reichenbach Fall” was an absolute masterpiece, one of the best television episodes ever, and this last season “His Last Vow was nearly as good, if not as logically tight.

    As to how it fits in the test…not really sure. The relationship with Mary was interesting, to say the least.

  47. Dalrock,

    “My father flew CSAR in Viet Nam so I grew up on that kind of thing. If you’ve seen it, I would be curious what your thoughts are on the other Nat Geo Afghanistan series “Battleground Afghanistan”. Likewise if you have any thoughts on “Alpha Company Iraq Diary”.”

    Man, I’d love to have a beer with your dad and listen to some war stories!

    I haven’t watched those two documentaries. I’ll have to check them out. Thanks for the recommendations.

  48. Pingback: A bridge too far. | Dalrock

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