True Story of the Times

Video is crude, and probably NSFW, but it’s all here.

Great song and a keenly insightful video. This is a good jump-off point for discussion with others. The perps, the victims, the methods…it’s a true story. Tell me what you see in the comments.

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32 thoughts on “True Story of the Times

  1. Cane, somewhat of a different topic: regret over having kids. Do you think this is a more recent mindset among women. I just can’t imagine it being a source of conversation 100 years ago. Also, I say women because I cannot recall ever hearing a father say this. It seems like the source of regret is the “tragic” loss of independence…and we all know how that independence thing worked out for Eve. Your thoughts?

    https://www.yahoo.com/parenting/i-think-id-have-a-better-life-if-i-never-had-my-113437498268.html : I Think I’d Have a Better Life if I Never Had My Kids

    “I wasn’t as much admitting to the ether that I regretted my life. No. I was asking Google to help me find other mothers who felt the same way. Hoping against hope that some other mother woke up in her mid-30s, realized her reality, and shared those shameful feelings: I wish I’d never had children.

    and

    https://www.yahoo.com/parenting/what-if-you-regret-having-children-117620834597.html
    My Mom Told Me She Regrets Having Children

    “It’s not that she didn’t love me. It’s not that she wished she didn’t have me. It’s that she knew becoming a mom meant her life would never again be entirely her own. “

  2. I could laugh or I could cry. Parents used to tell their children that God was watching in an effort to control their ‘bad’ behavior. Mostly it did not work because the children had no respect for God.Cain, anyone? The new god of course is government, a full color production of Satan himself, and the new god gets no respect. You would think .gov’s name was Rodney! So what if they are watching, I’m still gona do what I’m gona do. They say “fuck the NSA” just like they say “fuck God”. Dead fish floating downstream.

  3. @Seriously

    Ha! A few points, in case you criticism is half-serious

    1. I’ve seen people assume I’m a Boomer because of my life experiences. I’m 38; smack-dab in the age-range as the people making and choosing what currently constitutes hip. Big Data isn’t hip because 20-somethings said so, but because 30-and-40-somethings did.

    2. Trends for you are a proclivity. For me they are a necessity. As a husband and father I consider it a duty to know what is going on in the world. I actively both censor and promote new media that I think is bad and good, respectively. It’s a mistake for a husband and father to make do with 40’s big-band music, “The Quiet Man”, and reruns of “Father Knows Best”.

    3. Culturally, we are like the poorer Christians in Corinth who needed to buy sacrificed meat out of the back door of the pagan temples. We must take thoughts on media messages captive for Christ, and use our faculties to separate out what God has made good while recognizing and declaiming the pagan nonsense…unless of course we find that we can’t. Theoretically, a man could watch Hollywood Hookers 17, find some good, and discard the rest. I can’t. (Nor have I met the man who could.) I found that most participants of the Men’s Sphere couldn’t do so with Game, either.

    @8itg

    Cane, somewhat of a different topic: regret over having kids. Do you think this is a more recent mindset among women. I just can’t imagine it being a source of conversation 100 years ago.

    I think since the beginning parents have sometimes regretted their children, but I’m sure it’s more common now and the periods of regret more prolonged and less confronted. A focus on the false gods of self-esteem, materialism, and individualism is going to do that.

    So, you’re actually pretty on-topic.

  4. “I think since the beginning parents have sometimes regretted their children, but I’m sure it’s more common now and the periods of regret more prolonged and less confronted. A focus on the false gods of self-esteem, materialism, and individualism is going to do that.”

    Summarized in one word: selfish

  5. A line from Cane’s How to Vet a Wife post got me thinking when I saw those articles:

    “…that he encouraged independence and ultimately rebellion. Be wary!”

    Not sure if I had linked those two in my mind before: a quest for independence as a path to rebellion. That “independence” (and what does she mean by it?) that seems so enamoring to so many young women today — is that a tell that is tipping her hat to her future proclivities or a pathway that leads to something worse? Is it developing the state of her heart? Because being a wife and mother – being a Christian – is not conducive to “self-preservation”.

    I have a vested interest in these things. I have two little girls.

  6. Regretting kids… yeah, I get it. There’s huge potential for heartbreak. Especially in light of this vid’s insights. I wonder how readily my daughter could be duped by the marketers who are so expert at manipulating us through our basest desires and most primitive instincts. Quiet moments while out on a run, or driving home from work, fear creeps into my mind that despite all my efforts (no broadcast tv in the house, no cable, no satellite, vetted programming through internet services; she doesn’t have an iPod like half her grade 6 friends to cut down on the Katy Perry corruption; I read scripture with her, good poetry, encourage good books, etc.) the hormonal drives and vulnerability of her immaturity as a teen could undo everything and lead to alienation to some degree or another from me, and then a ruinous rejection of the Christian values I’ve tried to nurture. So, I fear losing my daughter, but also having her live out in her own life the tragedy of the decline of our civilization.

  7. @Scott

    Regretting kids… yeah, I get it.

    In my experience 11-14yo girls are among the most pitiful and hateful creatures in the world. Loving them despite that is a trying and sanctifying experience.

    @Empath & MtC

    I just wrote a ridiculously long comment at Dalrock’s, but I will regather my strength in a bit and lay out what I see in that music video.

  8. I can’t see regretting having kids however women regretting having them is nothing new. Someone was throwing kids into the fires of Baal and it was their own mothers.

    I can see regretting not spending enough time with them or trying to raise them better but not in having them. I do regret getting married to their mother however and have no problems saying it. I think kids for men are a reminder of God and marriage proof that hell is real.

  9. “So, I fear losing my daughter, but also having her live out in her own life the tragedy of the decline of our civilization.”

    Scott, I carry those same concerns. But that seems more like a fear than a regret. And if a future regret, it would be the regret of having her turn her back on the God and the father that love her, not the regret of what having her meant for you.

    As I think about those articles more, its not so much that those women regret having children, it’s that they regret losing their “freedom and independence”, they regret having to take on so much responsibility, that they can’t live out their whims. The children represent that loss. If they had a nanny that could do all of that for them and they could maintain the figurehead mother role — not so much regret.

  10. What struck me, is the advertising firm’s utter contempt for the target audience. No matter how absurd the pitch becomes, it gets the green light at the end. Modern culture is a target-rich environment for shiny objects to be peddled with slick marketing campaigns designed to prick the insecurities of women.

  11. music video is of a marketing brainstorming session, not a sales pitch. the corresponding lyric video is about the lack of privacy in an online world.

    this video, however, juxtaposes the final product w/ the process of getting to that product. the closed captioning in the beginning (“now with big data shoes”) is too blunt for a real add, but reinforces the theme here. the ad is targeted to women, not men, but the objectification of women in it is accepted as useful and supported by the women on the marketing team. the ad encourages women to take control of their lives and express that control by acting more like men (the violence, and kissing other women) and by dressing like men (the sneakers are a masculine style)

    other observations:

    * “big data” is the current computing fad – it is here associated w/ completly unrelated things (“big data means big ideas” wtf)
    * biased study group – pick the study group to get the sort of results you want
    * the sneakers are a reference to the Nike thing that was going on a while ago?
    * bouncing boobs & running outfits & lesbians = sex sells
    * gore = violence sells. also power (to kill) and freedom (not punished for killing)
    * the running add itself is reminiscent of the ad in “What Women Want” (2000) the ad in that film also sells the “freedom” and “empowerment” ideals

    * perfect gender equality in the media group (4 men, 4 women) but
    * balding man makes the final decision
    * dick-writer has an in w/ the bald man, but contributes nothing else
    * hipster and nerd drive the entire concept
    * none of the women provide original input to the process. at best they are there for the men to guage a women’s reaction to the ad
    * the oldest woman in the group does the most work – she writes on the whiteboard

  12. Possibly my feelings about mothers who say they are glad they don’t have children are tainted because I know (really knew) a girl whose father once told her that if her mother got pregnant with another kid he’d make her get an abortion.

    Even with the abortion aside (as if such a thing is really possible) this sort of callous attitude towards one’s offspring struck me as nothing short of horrifying.

    In this case, I will hear no excuses for the father. That sort of attitude is nothing short of contemptible. I felt bad for her. She had a tough childhood.

  13. @SW

    Thanks for participating, and welcome!

    the corresponding lyric video is about the lack of privacy in an online world.

    Yes, the advertisers, loyalty card programs, credit card companies; everybody “loving” the consumers every action.

    bet you didn’t know someone could love you this much”

    The shoes are a kind of symbolic variable, an “X”. Suppose we plug in “hip-hop” for X: Angry black dude activity gets slickly repackaged as female empowerment, and so we have the vileness of Nikki Minaj and Iggy Azalea out there. Plug in BC pills: Less attractive but otherwise competent men and ugly old women “die” to society as useless. Plug in immodest “active-wear”, and you get the same thing. Plug in dating websites. Plug in affirmative action labor quotas. Plug in college admittance quotas.

    It was kind of a game for me to think about different things.

    The nerd/hipster frontline producers never question the morality of the thing; just its effects. They just want to sell their nifty product.

    Good catch on the gender equality of the pitch session.

    The dick drawing is a head, and has boobs where the balls should be. It’s a drawing of dickhead women.

    The oldest woman makes the exploitation palatable to the other women; soothing the younger women’s feminist responses and playing-up the empowerment aspect.

    All the victims are the sideliners of life, and killing them is acceptable to those at the top. The first guy is your average cubicle dwelling man, then an old homeless woman, and last an out-of-work construction sort.

    The head-butt violence is chosen in particular, and ties back to the dickhead woman picture. They don’t do anything except head-butt. They even head-butt the last dudes leg-off to accentuate the absurdity so that you notice it; a symbol of narcissism and head-strongness writ very large.

    And, yeah, the person at the top making the decision to unleash this is a rich man who doesn’t respect anyone who’s not making him money this very instant. He’s visibly bored throughout the presentation, and then his celebration is to flip the bird at the marketing crew.

  14. @ dvdivx says:
    May 4, 2015 at 3:04 pm

    “Someone was throwing kids into the fires of Baal and it was their own mothers.”

    It was mostly fathers.

  15. @Cane,
    “The dick drawing is a head, and has boobs where the balls should be. It’s a drawing of dickhead women.”

    Missed that. Nice catch.

    I’ll add to your and Steve’s note that the violence is over the top in a way we trust men not to actively commit. Women “become strong” here by engaging in a ridiculous caricature of masculinity.

    @Oscar,

    Yeah I was going to say that too. I can’t remember all the names right now but the vast majority of the recorded cases were fathers. They, after all, were the ordinary religious leaders (ordinary here used in its formal sense) of their homes. The family “priests” as it were and would offer the sacrifices.

  16. @ Cane

    I have an off-topic question for you regarding 1 Cor 14.

    34 Women should remain silent in the churches. They are not allowed to speak, but must be in submission, as the law says. 35 If they want to inquire about something, they should ask their own husbands at home; for it is disgraceful for a woman to speak in the church.

    I understand the entire chapter’s subject is maintaining constructive order in collective worship, but I don’t understand why it’s inherently “disgraceful” or detrimental to constructive order for a woman “speak in the church”.

    Or, am I missing something about what Paul is referencing when he mentions women speaking in church?

  17. the dick drawing @2:32 is definitely of a dick, not a woman’s head in the shape of a dick.
    the man’s “notes” are hilariously off topic.

  18. I understand the entire chapter’s subject is maintaining constructive order in collective worship, but I don’t understand why it’s inherently “disgraceful” or detrimental to constructive order for a woman “speak in the church”.

    In two different mixed-sex Bible studies I’ve led, I have had women drone on and on off-topic, caught up in their feelings on the subject.

    “God is love, so God is feelings! Feelings are important!” That Bible Study had previously emphasized that Biblical love is an act of will, not feelings – and I’m ashamed now that I let that go on with no answer for 5 minutes. Need to learn to cut off unfruitful tangents in a discussion.

    What I am learning from those experiences and various Manosphere/Game blogs is that women are not men with boobs, they have a womanly nature that processes the world differently. And they can and will go on a chain of “logic” that is not.

  19. @ Oscar

    I understand the entire chapter’s subject is maintaining constructive order in collective worship, but I don’t understand why it’s inherently “disgraceful” or detrimental to constructive order for a woman “speak in the church”.

    I have my ideas, but In all my years, I have never been in a church that practiced this, so practically I don’t know how it would look. If anything, for curiosity’s sake, I would like so see what would come of it. I have a suspicion that I might be quite surprised.

    Looking forward to Cane’s post.

  20. @Oscar: Women asking questions in the assembly show a fundamental disrespect for her husband and /or father if he is also a member of the assembly. Did she ask at home and not get an answer? Are the men in her home without knowledge? Or is it that she doesn’t respect their answers? She wants an answer from a ‘real’ authority. If headship serves no real purpose, why pretend that the husband is the head? If the woman’s husband/father is not a christian, then for decorum’s sake she should ask her questions privately, so as to not lead others astray.I once attended a church where an elder did not know who Jeremiah was. If churches actually practiced this observance, then men would be obligated to be more knowledgeable and wise in the Scriptures and the ways of God.

  21. Pingback: Find the Lady in Weighting: The Church Woman’s Con Game | Things that We have Heard and Known

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