Nothing Jew Under the Son

Back to St. Paul. In this post I quoted his second letter to the Corinthians. He wrote:

16 From now on, therefore, we regard no one according to the flesh. Even though we once regarded Christ according to the flesh, we regard him thus no longer.17 Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creation. The old has passed away; behold, the new has come.

Once, according to the flesh and to fulfill His Father’s will, Jesus was a Jew. He has fulfilled that prophecy, died, and rose from the dead returning to His true and eternal self, the only begotten Son of God. Anyone who is in Christ has also died, and now is alive for true and a new thing. Not the old thing.

It’s commonly taught that we Christians are the “New Jews” but that is only true in the sense that Jew is a metaphor for God’s People. In fact it was never the case that genetics was the basis of who was a member of God’s People. Abraham, a Chaldean, was chosen by God, adopted, and was sealed by circumcision. The promise that was given to him was given under the law by which I mean the order of, and according to, the material world of which the law God gave Moses corresponds. In his letter to the Galatians, St. Paul says it this way:

23 Now before faith came, we were held captive under the law, imprisoned until the coming faith would be revealed. 24 So then, the law was our guardian until Christ came, in order that we might be justified by faith.

That law included all sorts of rules about how the people of Israel were to interact with–and prohibit–foreigners. This post is already going to be very long and it would bloat to tens of thousands of words if I included them all, but here is an example which takes place just before the Israelites flee Egypt, and before the law is given:

43 And the Lord said to Moses and Aaron, “This is the statute of the Passover: no foreigner shall eat of it, 44 but every slave that is bought for money may eat of it after you have circumcised him. 45 No foreigner or hired worker may eat of it. 46 It shall be eaten in one house; you shall not take any of the flesh outside the house, and you shall not break any of its bones. 47 All the congregation of Israel shall keep it. 48 If a stranger shall sojourn with you and would keep the Passover to the Lord, let all his males be circumcised. Then he may come near and keep it; he shall be as a native of the land. But no uncircumcised person shall eat of it. 49 There shall be one law for the native and for the stranger who sojourns among you.”

It looks like a set of rules with principled exceptions, but in reality there are no exceptions to the rule that the Passover is to be kept by Israelites and none of it given to foreigners or hired workers. Period. What looks like exceptions are actually instructions of how those slaves and foreigners, by faith, become Israelites; because one who is circumcised in faithful obedience to God is as Abraham himself. There shall be one law for the native and the stranger who sojourns among you. That law is faith in God which produces obedience. One law for one people.

In his letter to the Romans, St. Paul explains this (of which this is only a short bit)

10 How then was [righteousness] counted to him? Was it before or after he had been circumcised? It was not after, but before he was circumcised. 11 He received the sign of circumcision as a seal of the righteousness that he had by faith while he was still uncircumcised. The purpose was to make him the father of all who believe without being circumcised, so that righteousness would be counted to them as well, 12 and to make him the father of the circumcised who are not merely circumcised but who also walk in the footsteps of the faith that our father Abraham had before he was circumcised.

Whoever shares one father is from the same nation; the same ethnicity. Under Abraham that ethnicity is one of faith, but under Christ, who is the fulfillment of that faith, we truly share in blood. St. Paul explains it magnificently in his letter to the Ephesians:

11 Therefore remember that at one time you Gentiles in the flesh, called “the uncircumcision” by what is called the circumcision, which is made in the flesh by hands— 12 remember that you were at that time separated from Christ, alienated from the commonwealth of Israel and strangers to the covenants of promise, having no hope and without God in the world. 13 But now in Christ Jesus you who once were far off have been brought near by the blood of Christ. 14 For he himself is our peace, who has made us both one and has broken down in his flesh the dividing wall of hostility 15 by abolishing the law of commandments expressed in ordinances, that he might create in himself one new man in place of the two, so making peace, 16 and might reconcile us both to God in one body through the cross, thereby killing the hostility. 17 And he came and preached peace to you who were far off and peace to those who were near. 18 For through him we both have access in one Spirit to the Father. 19 So then you are no longer strangers and aliens, but you are fellow citizens with the saints and members of the household of God, 20 built on the foundation of the apostles and prophets, Christ Jesus himself being the cornerstone, 21 in whom the whole structure, being joined together, grows into a holy temple in the Lord. 22 In him you also are being built together into a dwelling place for God by the Spirit.

Made us both Jew and Gentiles one. Fellow citizens. Members of the household of God. One temple. One people. He writes the same to the Galatians because of their struggles with the anti-Christian Jews who try to ritually ensnare those who formerly were Gentiles in the flesh. The end of his thought which I quoted above is powerful and direct:

23 Now before faith came, we were held captive under the law, imprisoned until the coming faith would be revealed. 24 So then, the law was our guardian until Christ came, in order that we might be justified by faith. 25 But now that faith has come, we are no longer under a guardian, 26 for in Christ Jesus you are all sons of God, through faith. 27 For as many of you as were baptized into Christ have put on Christ. 28 There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free, there is no male and female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus. 29 And if you are Christ’s, then you are Abraham’s offspring, heirs according to promise.

It wasn’t that Gentiles became Jews, but that both are done away with in Christ and we, and our blood, are now something new and better.[1] There are still Jews and Gentiles in the world, and for we who are in Christ mixing with them, marrying and having sex with them, it is miscegenation and a sin.

There are sinful compulsions which are particularly rampant among Jews, and the various Gentile nations are each bedeviled by sins to which they are respectively given. St. Paul, while counseling Titus, speaks of both Jews and Cretans in a race-realist way that would cause wailing and gnashing of teeth in most churches:

10 For there are many who are insubordinate, empty talkers and deceivers, especially those of the circumcision party. 11 They must be silenced, since they are upsetting whole families by teaching for shameful gain what they ought not to teach. 12 One of the Cretans, a prophet of their own, said, “Cretans are always liars, evil beasts, lazy gluttons.” 13 This testimony is true. Therefore rebuke them sharply, that they may be sound in the faith, 14 not devoting themselves to Jewish myths and the commands of people who turn away from the truth. 15 To the pure, all things are pure, but to the defiled and unbelieving, nothing is pure; but both their minds and their consciences are defiled. 16 They profess to know God, but they deny him by their works. They are detestable, disobedient, unfit for any good work.

Jews are deceitful, gossiping swindlers; Cretans are lying, lazy, evil, gluttonous beasts; both are good for nothing.[2] They are not in Christ. Those who were formerly Jews and formerly Cretans are in Christ, and they are something new in one new nation which is of Christ’s blood; as are we.

[1] See: Wineskins 

[2] So if someone says “Those cretans jewed me out of my money.”, we should assume that person is somewhat biblically literate.

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23 thoughts on “Nothing Jew Under the Son

  1. “Patriotism is the last refuge of a scoundrel.” -Dr Samuel Johnson

    —–

    However, [it is assured] that Johnson was not indicting patriotism in general, only false patriotism.

    A.J.P.

  2. Here’s the part that often gets ignored in debates about race among Christians:

    13 This testimony is true. Therefore rebuke them sharply, that they may be sound in the faith,

    In other words, the Gospel has the power to transform people.

    Back when we were still living in the Northwest, we sent our kids to a private school for the first time (before that, we home schooled). The church that runs that school has English, Spanish and Korean services, so there are lots of kids of all three ethnicities (and various mixtures thereof) at the school.

    When Aimee and I met with the principal (and pastor of the church), we talked a bit about their Spanish service (since the fact that I’m a Central American immigrant came up). In the course of the conversation, he said “I tell you, those Mexicans, when they get saved, they’re the most wonderful Christians, but the ones that aren’t; they’re criminals!”

    Having observed that transformation myself many times, I have to admit that crusty old Southern Baptist preacher was right!

  3. A great title and post; I particularly appreciated the point on miscegenation.

    Any plans to do a post on 1 Peter 2?

  4. ”There are still Jews and Gentiles in the world, and for we who are in Christ mixing with them, marrying and having sex with them, it is miscegenation and a sin.”

    What prompted this comment?

    Is marrying people outside your ethnic group a sin? How so?

  5. @Ray

    I enjoy reading Vox’s blog. He is unafraid to question the dominant theories and narratives of the world, but what I have wrote and what he writes are not the same things. Come back when you’re sober.

    @GJ

    My pleasure, and thanks for reminding me of that passage. I have probably one more post one the subject and that will fit in with the other scripture I was going to highlight.

    @iw1

    Is marrying people outside your ethnic group a sin? How so?

    We are not to be unequally yoked, and we should not unite ourselves with those who are unclean. Whoever is not in Christ is unclean to the Christian; except in the case of a married couple of which one converts to Christianity after their wedding.

  6. Pingback: Miscegenation, sanctification, imperatives, and principles | Christianity and masculinity

  7. Pingback: The nations under punishment are mad [Job 12] | Dark Brightness

  8. In practical terms, my current White , mostly secular neighbors cause a whole lot less problems then the church going non Whites we’re I use to live. As in no problems vs every few weeks. Not to mention small stuff like no littering, people obeying the speed limits, dogs kept in check, no one honking their car horn in the 0 dark-thirty, no music blaring….

    Well it’s a long list and sadly your proposition doesn’t pass the boots on the ground test.

  9. @SFC Ton

    I know exactly what you mean, but I don’t think you understand what I meant.

    Evidence of regular crime among church-goers (whatever their color) is evidence that they are not Christian, and therefore merely white/black/mestizo/whathaveyou.

  10. I know that’s the popular argument, Cane and on the surface it makes sense but we also know Paul struggled and sinned. Of what type, who knows but if a man who has seen Christ and worked miracles struggles with sin, how can we expect everyday believers not to be sinners, crapy neighbors etc

    We also cannot weigh a man’s heart like the Almighty so we never really know if another man’s faith is legitimate

    And crime is only a part of it. They were generally no fun to live with based on an utter lack of respect for all things. Like the litter and various noise issues

    Your neighborhood/ nation etc of all believers is not workable in this life. We will not have some ideal set of circumstances or skill set to judge a professing man’s/ woman/ kid/ family’s faith etc until Christ returns, but until then, racial segregation does the job of improving quality of life. It’s simple, relatively easy and time tested effective.

  11. @SFC Ton

    You’re shifting the goalpost of the conversation. The question (or questions if one prefers to separate them) my posts answer is: “What did the Lord reveal through the Bible about the truth of our flesh and in what nation am I?

    What you are talking is about is the difficulty you find in living in accordance with that truth.

    I know that’s the popular argument

    I don’t think it is popular at all! If we apply what I wrote to adoption, for example, no one is holier, or has done better, for adopting children from Asia, Africa, Eastern Europe, etc. If ever they bring it up it is shame and to their discredit. It would be like gloating to have eaten food that was once defiled by idols! Not only do they shame themselves, but also their children because they are saying that 1) the children were defiled and 2) that it was the will of the parents which saved the children. Such a boastful parent makes himself into The Savior; which is false, heretical, idolatrous, prideful, and blasphemous.

    The same benefits you perceive about living according to the worldly flesh have been applied before and predominate to this day. The world thinks fornication is a good way to sort mates. The world thinks government authority alone over marriages solves family problems. The world thinks unearned money can solve problems of sin and crime and fatherlessness. The world thinks public schools will solve ignorance. I could go on all day. The fact that you, me, St. Paul, Mexicans, Blacks, and whoever else aren’t yet perfected is a terrible reason to critique what the Lord has said. In fact it is the reason we are to ask for His help to do what we cannot do.

    None of that means that one shouldn’t get away from people who are trapped in sin and their flesh; even if they claim to be Christian. This also isn’t very popular.

  12. I don’t see where I am shifting the goal post nor is it my intent but I don’t think it’s wrong to talk about on the ground practicality. We live in a fallen world and have to navigate it. Wise as serpents and all.

    And at no point have I critiqued the Word of God. I have pointed out to you there is no way for us, as humans to know who is and who is not a believer, and because of that additional measures should be taken

    There is nothing inherently unbiblical about segregation. And since it is not forbidden, it is allowed. Is relying on seat belts living by the flesh? There is nothing unbiblical about keeping your house safe with a gun, a pit bull and prayer vs prayer alone, nor is it unbiblical to rely on a life jacket to help keep your kids from drowning vs relying on prayer alone.

    Is there a biblically approve way to measure another man’s spiritual condition?

    Men must judge other men and situtions all the time. With Bibcal wisdom and earthly intell

    Are we not supposed to test what is said/written about God?

    Unless I grossly missunderstand, what you have written is another version of diversity is good, but with a spiritual caveat, as in diversity is fine if all are belivers, which is extremely popular from the pulpit and within the culture at large, though your point about adoption is legit

    Seems to me the you are living according to flesh line is the Biblical version of calling someone racist; it is designed to shut down all further debate

  13. Is there a biblically approve way to measure another man’s spiritual condition?

    Fruits. Out of the overflow of the heart the mouth speaks.

    Results, and words. Fruits may take time to see, and words can be deceptive, but enough time and words will sort both out.

  14. Legit enough but how does “enough time and words” parley into choosing a place to live or allowing which kind of demographic groups to enter your nation?

  15. @SFC Ton

    Just got out of work and about to crash, but I wanted to address a couple smaller points:

    I don’t see where I am shifting the goal post nor is it my intent […]

    Unless I grossly missunderstand, what you have written is another version of diversity is good, but with a spiritual caveat, as in diversity is fine if all are belivers

    I think you have misunderstood me, and in fact I don’t believe you meant to move the goalposts. Originally I wrote that I thought you had moved them unintentionally, but I edited that out instead of trying to guess your mind.

    What I have written is that whoever is in Christ is sanctified because He is good; not because diversity itself is good. My suggestion on where to move, for example, would be “Among practicing Christians”. By practicing I mean they produce good fruit, as SirHamster said.

    Seems to me the you are living according to flesh line is the Biblical version of calling someone racist

    Sort of. But I’m also saying that to be a racist is natural in the way it is natural to prefer one’s own family (There are some hard sayings Christ has about our family members, too.), and I’m also admitting that there are differences in the races. I’m further pointing out that they can be insurmountable outside of Christ, but that within Christ they can be reconciled.

    To put my mind into some more concrete terms: I think it is more beholden for blacks and Mexicans in America to “act like white people” than for white people to make accommodations for every variety. Christians are called to peace and its not peaceful to show up in another country and demand those people reorganize around what made one comfortable back in one’s ancestral home. So, no, Juan, it’s not okay for you to throw that trash-bag off the side of the highway. And, as a fellow Christian, I am able to say that to them.

    And also think every illegal alien ought to be rounded up and deported, nor will I shed any tears over it. Part of being a Christian is obeying the law. That goes for all of us. Sneaking into a country and living under the radar with stolen or forged identities isn’t the same as pleading for asylum.

    it is designed to shut down all further debate

    No. I’m saying if one is a Christian he already has a nation–a for real nation which should be observed and its members treated as brothers–and that nation is Christ’s Body.

  16. lol deportation and telling them to act White will make you unpopular at a church soical for sure
    Clearly we are both arguing in good faith.

    I agree with you on most points, and the disagreements are minor and not particularly relevant. It’s the how to implement this that jams me up. I generally look at these sort of things in the how to install advise my sons/ young men I mentor point of view

    The Gospels are key to salvation, but Proverbs is foundational to organizing a good life. It is full of concrete real world examples of what to do and not do, I say that to say this,

    How do you find that good fruit/ area full of believers? My certia on where I wanted to live is probably not much different then any other guy with women and kids and what not under his care and authority . Quite, clean, the various kinds of safety and what not. Easy enough to find simply by moving into an up scale White area( if you have the fiscal resources). Up scale college educated etc Whites are secular, often liberal but as Charles Murray points out, they live “conservative”

    I am not disputing any Bibcal argument you’ve put forth because we agree. Or agree enough and I don’t generally split hairs. However, finding a body of believers and looking at their fruit isn’t very actionable advice. Lest not that I can figure. Living among low crime/ high trust demographic groups is simple and effective. Lest wise in my AOL.

    So it comes down to , how does a man find that community of legit believers in a timely manner? How you’d you advise a man to organize and conduct his search?

  17. However, finding a body of believers and looking at their fruit isn’t very actionable advice.

    Perhaps not, but the original question was about Biblically approved methods to evaluate a man’s internal spiritual condition.

    Legit enough but how does “enough time and words” parley into choosing a place to live or allowing which kind of demographic groups to enter your nation?

    We do have a bit of data from the past 50 years about what immigrants do, so we already have some fruit to taste and make a stab at answering the second question.

    As for where to live, that will depend on your objectives. Is your mission to live set apart from the world? To live in the city amidst the world, acting as salt and light for a decayed culture?

    Are you of a Christian family with a God-given mission from your fathers, or are you the first father of many leaving home for a Promised Land? Same situation, different choice based on what you are supposed to be doing for God.

  18. @SFC Ton

    So it comes down to , how does a man find that community of legit believers in a timely manner? How you’d you advise a man to organize and conduct his search?

    Good questions. I’m working on it. More specifically, we need to find out how to create it because everyone is spread-out.

    Young men need guidance through the minefield not word play and platitudes

    Also true, but for anyone to provide concrete guidance for boots-on-the-ground action he needs to know about that specific minefield, the specific young men, etc. The hifalutin’ wordplay is prudential judgment. The young men around you need to get that from you and the previously-mentioned community…which brings us back to how to create that.

  19. Legit and honest answer

    Semi related comment aimed at the Church at large; one of the reasons the Church is dying is mout pastors, mentors etc hand out platitudes vs wisdom and courses of action

  20. Pingback: Babylon, the Necropolis | Things that We have Heard and Known

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