Salesmen and Sissy-Slappers

Repurposed from a comment here:


There is, in our effeminate consumerist society, this overarching belief that a good man is a successful man, and the successful man is the man who can sell (things, ideas, even truth), and that the way to do this is to be flattering, and even to be pleasing to the things that come out of the hearts of men, and “empathize”. 1 Cor. 9:19-23 is often mischaracterized in just that way…

19 For though I am free from all, I have made myself a servant to all, that I might win more of them. 20 To the Jews I became as a Jew, in order to win Jews. To those under the law I became as one under the law (though not being myself under the law) that I might win those under the law. 21 To those outside the law I became as one outside the law (not being outside the law of God but under the law of Christ) that I might win those outside the law. 22 To the weak I became weak, that I might win the weak. I have become all things to all people, that by all means I might save some. 23 I do it all for the sake of the gospel, that I may share with them in its blessings.

…so that we are falsely taught that we are to be nice, and that a man who isn’t able to sell the truth to this or that person must have done it wrong. But what Paul said was he became like the person. He did not “empathize”. He lived like those people, and spoke to them in terms they would understand. Well, Wilson is a Christian blogger and his tagline is “Theology that bites back”. What should being like Wilson look like?

We have two problems here. The first is the argument between Wilson and Dalrock. But the second problem is more pressing–if you can believe it–and it is that the great majority of men–especially Christian men–are effeminate consumerists ready to sissy-slap any man who isn’t a nice and empathetic salesman. (Such men don’t sissy-slap women because women are the arbiters of niceness and empathy, and you can’t hit the ref.) Truly it is effeminate and it comes from men. This second problem disgusts me, and I bet I’m not the only one. In fact, I bet that in other circumstances it disgusts some of the very men who are here doing the sissy-slapping.

Over the years I have endured a good amount of criticism and even ridicule, and sometimes from some fairly big fish in our little pond: Novaseeker, Vox Day, Zippy Catholic, Slumlord/Social Pathologist, to name a few. I count those as blessings, and those are all writers I still read because I can learn, and have learned, from them. It would be a gross error to ignore their sometimes rude criticisms of me merely because I felt they were mean to me, or not empathic enough. And the error would be mine; not theirs.

And if I can be foolish a little more: My own criticisms–which have sometimes been rude and bombastic–have cleared the mental landscape for other men to follow behind me, and has allowed them to be more patriarchal with more emotional and mental comfort. You’re welcome.

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6 thoughts on “Salesmen and Sissy-Slappers

  1. Well, Wilson is a Christian blogger and his tagline is “Theology that bites back”. What should being like Wilson look like?

    The pervasive fear Wilson’s readers have of someone offending him is really telling. Why are they so afraid? He is after all a rough tough theologian. He can take it, right?

    My guess is that Wilson would be offended if he saw his readers pleading with us to baby him so. He might suffer this offense in silence, but I suspect he would be offended all the same.

    How dare they!

  2. My own criticisms–which have sometimes been rude and bombastic–have cleared the mental landscape for other men to follow behind me, and has allowed them to be more patriarchal with more emotional and mental comfort. You’re welcome.

    I am one of those men. Thank you.

  3. @Dalrock

    My guess is that Wilson would be offended if he saw his readers pleading with us to baby him so. He might suffer this offense in silence, but I suspect he would be offended all the same.

    I do know that he overlooks criticism from others in his own blog’s comments. Is he offended by the manner in which he is defended? I don’t know.

    @Caspar

    It is truly my pleasure, and you have paid me back many times over. I always read your comments because they encourage me.

  4. Cane Caldo is a known hardcore that’s for sure, and it sounds like maybe by design; but you really can’t win a fight without such men.

    In the US military there are men that can’t stay out of trouble during peacetime, which is realistically most of the time. They suck up a lot of energy. When it’s time to go and fight however everyone looks for them and wants them nearby. These are the “break glass in case of war” men. You see them in action and think, thank God he’s on our side.

  5. “My own criticisms–which have sometimes been rude and bombastic–have cleared the mental landscape for other men to follow behind me, and has allowed them to be more patriarchal with more emotional and mental comfort. You’re welcome.

    I am one of those men.”

    Me too. Thanks and good work, Cane.

  6. Whenever I hear of people who look at the philosophy of Christianity as a motivation for soft, untruthful, “niceness” I think of the part of the Gospel where Christ talks about how Christians are to be as the salt of the earth, and that any salt which has lost his savour is worth nothing more than to be thrown onto the path and then stepped on (enjoying the poetic “imperfection” of the ancient 1611 Authorised Version which has gendered salt).

    After all, the Lord became not to bring peace, but a sword.

    To the Scripture quoted in this blogpost, it is also important to note that the life of a missionary is one that is different than the life of most priests, and most of the rest of the body of Christ. Missionaries are a lot like Mr Stephen “Steve” Irwin, going into strange places and their life-and-death situations while appreciated are indeed atypical (but if serving the Kingdom of God, they are holy). According to the history of the early Church, both Ss Peter and Paul worked together to evangelise the nations after the Ascension of Our Lord, but passed into life eternal having earned their crowns of martyrdom: Peter was crucified on an inverted cross, and Paul being a Roman citizen was beheaded.

    A.J.P.

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