Sometimes the Customer is Wrong

As far as I can tell there is really only one acceptable way to punish women, and that is exclusion.  All mankind are social creatures and will suffer from exclusion, but because women are more sociable and more dependent they will more keenly suffer when left out. This makes exclusion more deterring, and thus more instructive, for women. In addition, most people (including myself) just aren’t going to stomach any more than the minimum violence necessary to stop a woman either from a dangerous or criminal activity, or move her away from the same.

This is our biggest problem as a democratic, atomized, consumerist, and faddish society. Nobody can exclude anybody when everybody is already alone, here in Babylon. And we really are. This is compounded by the fact that entry into–and affiliation with–another superficial social group is a trite and silly affair which can be accomplished by the purchase of a tee shirt. If a man kicks out his belligerent wife, she’ll just get a new shirt, a new church, and a new husband. No one cares. Everyone acts as if these acts were not superficial.

Immigration, minority criminality, and white male apathy really are serious troubles right now. They are problems which are too big to be ignored in the meantime, and we each need to do our best to combat them as we can. But none of them will be resolved–or even meaningfully combated–unless and until men band together into significant, genuine, geographical, and exclusive communities.

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12 thoughts on “Sometimes the Customer is Wrong

  1. Social exclusion… The ‘walking away’ part is what makes Dread Game very effective. Problem is, with some women, as soon as you walk away, there’s 10 back-up men waiting to swoop in. Men need to practice more solidarity by enforcing some much needed discipline, when appropriate.

  2. @Sigma

    Problem is, with some women, as soon as you walk away, there’s 10 back-up men waiting to swoop in. Men need to practice more solidarity by enforcing some much needed discipline, when appropriate.

    Exactly. To even begin to address it, we must decide around what to have solidarity.

  3. “until men band together into significant, genuine, geographical, and exclusive communities.”

    I think most of what prevents this is logistics. People live spread apart and drive everywhere. 2 hrs commutes are not uncommon. (In cities,) The people you live near are extremely unlikely to share any significant beliefs with you if you are at all trad. Physical closeness is a necessary prerequisite for real community forming in my experience. (To wit, the only “real” community capable of exclusion that I’ve ever been a part of was in college, with the roommates I lived with and saw every day.) People you see at church often drove 30+ minutes, and maybe from the opposite direction. The barries to community are structural. And we’re all trained from birth to be lazy.

  4. men band together into significant, genuine, geographical, and exclusive communities.

    What the founding fathers thought they were putting in place.

    Nobody can exclude anybody when everybody is already alone, here in Babylon. And we really are.

    What we somehow ended up with.

  5. Yes we really are alone. How odd that “Community” is a buzzword in the present iteration of what we call church. The idea that people will form up into small groups and then the church is living in community, so to speak, is now just annoying to me.

    If you think that groups that could be the product of a random number generator will be comprised of families that will care for one another, you’d be correct in one sense. Caring for one another is a major quench for empathy craving women. So they families will deliver a casserole to the family with a sick family member. But the guy who was married and part of the group, and is now frivorced and lives on a cousins couch, there will be nothing but disdain and hide-the-kids-honey from that monster.

    Yep…..alone.

    (I’ll be passing by the evening of the 26th)

  6. I think that a lot of people simply don’t take the practise of their religion very seriously. There is a lot to do, however, especially if one practises the liturgy that is available in a religion like mine which comes from the 1928 Book of Common Prayer. Some people don’t or won’t appreciate liturgical standards, rather holding the perceived freedom of not having set schedules of routine as part of their religion—even though those people could be setting up, at least, informal but persistent routines. After all those same people will often have regularly meeting, informal prayer groups… But if a person were to suggest that they should fast in regular patterns, a mental line would be crossed and they would refuse.

    But I am not lacking for community in a “hierarchy of needs” sense, staying busy as I have just described. Indeed, working through the calendar year of the Church—shared by numerous other Christians—is something that is inherently social. For the moment, I find myself between the winter Ember Days and this means regulating intake of food and excluding meat (abstinence and fasting) while also adding prayers (collects) and readings that are part of the formal calendar and informal practices (meaning, I took initiative and liberty to add it myself as a way of learning holisticly the ideas round about the liturgical standards). Other people at church practise somewhat similiarly, some less and some differently, but that’s O.K. since the necessary elements always come through because there’s a minimum amount of order that is needed to hold a congregation together, too scanty in general—C.C. is right that the greater society is too weak and this partly causes negative trends—but even as somebody who does not have his own wife and kids, there is still a lot to do and do with serious commitment. The father has his own routines and specialised work: and a single Christian man has his certain tasks as well.

    Another occupying concept that Christians ought to heed more (or continue to heed at the same righteous level) is the place of almsgiving and tithing in their lives. Tithing is crucial to sustain and participate as a dutiful member of congregational and disocesan society, but almsgiving orients the perspective of the giver toward the poor and sick and takes especial aim at the ills of the world. And so doing alms involves the Christian in intense spiritual conflict with wickedness. One must strike a proper balance for those good deeds, probably unavoidably remembering that “tithe” means a tenth, with all of its implications…

    A.J.P.

  7. If you don’t mind, approve as is, C.C.

    In a word of explanation, it’s because I use F.B. for one thing and my old account was suspended. And I can never totally keep track of which account may be logged in at the widget when I write something. Unless you only want one of my accounts posting here, if perhaps you think it’s less confusing… But this may happen again, I can’t be sure, and plus it’s really the content of comment over the name attatched (at least for me).

    Thank you, friend.

  8. I was thinking some more about the idea that everyone is alone, and juxtaposing it with the non-stop use of hand held devices I see all around me, that seem to convince the operators that they are never alone.

    My 80 year old mother just exchanged comments with my sister, who lives in Asia, then quickly diverted to an Aunt in the Caribbean, then another child in another state. This is a tiny example that is representative of what is actually a way of life for millions of people. Those that have the relative wealth and leisure for it that is.

    Is it a particularly insidious sort of loneliness, where the participants feel they are actually part of an active group of people that cares about them, though those people are seldom seen? Or does this electronic, long range connection actually help the players by giving them the notion of a connection, where they otherwise wouldn’t even have that?

    This is a separate category from those that use the medium to signal their travels and achievements to a wide audience that likely doesn’t much care, or that will made jealous, which is obviously sometimes the intent.

  9. Pingback: The Round Table of the Manosphere | Σ Frame

  10. “Exactly. To even begin to address it, we must decide around what to have solidarity.”

    Agreed. For my part, it starts with discipling young men i have influence over and doubling efforts to keep those men who are my iron around me.

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