The Authoritative and Auditory Almighty

Thanks to the men over at Social Matter eZine for linking a couple of my posts in their round-up: This Week in Reaction.

Much more important than my posts is an article they linked by W.M. Brigg, “Lee Strobel Asks, ‘Are Miracles Real and Still Happening?’“. Read it, and don’t miss the YouTube clip of a pastor named Duane Miller as he recovers his voice in the twinkling of an eye. I have never heard of Miller before. I pray he uses his blessing for good and God’s Kingdom.

Go read it, and then come back. I got all day, man.

So there is another story about a woman in the Mayo Clinic who was healed in a flash. The article is about the miracles themselves, but it contains a witness that I love to hear:

 

Strobel showed a video clip of Snyder. She said she was lying in hospice when “all of a sudden I heard a booming loud authoritative voice, ‘My child, get up and walk!’”

 

When God spoke to her she really heard it; like she would hear any other voice. It boomed. She didn’t have a feeling. She didn’t interpret her own musings as God speaking to her. She heard a voice. Then God’s majesty and power was witnessed by others.

Anything else is a con or delusion.

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5 thoughts on “The Authoritative and Auditory Almighty

  1. Youtube “clip” made me think it had video.

    The Miller recording is amazing. Praise God!

    Thank you for the links. Great start to the day.

  2. A miracle is by definition an intervention or even a contravention to what we call the laws of nature, or more accurately, of our experience. There is evidently a higher law of which the laws of nature are a subset or a special case, and which is not violated in the case of a miracle. But when miraculous intervention occurs, it necessarily affects the physical world.

    For example, in discussing the feeding of the five thousand, did Jesus make grains of wheat appear ex nihilo? Or did some grains disappear from a granary somewhere and appear in the form of bread on the hillside. Why didn’t Jesus just say poof, let the people be not hungry any more, and we don’t bother with the bread and all that. He made bread that the people had to eat and assimilate the molecules to get the nutrition from it. And the account treats the appearance of bread in a matter-of-fact way, as though no one really noticed that it wasn’t there and then it was.

    Some accuse God of being deceptive by creating Adam with the appearance of age, say of thirty years. But to be fully functional he had to be fully “grown”; the appearance of a thing is a reflection of its nature. But to gather the function or age of a thing from its appearance of age is a matter of experience, of which there was none at that time.

    Thus, a blind person who suddenly sees, would not be able from seeing a pencil to understand what it was. Not only would his lack of experience prevent that but the other things such as color would be too new and provide visual confusion until he had learned. So the miracle of the blind man seeing was not only that he could see, but that he knew the people walking around looked like trees. The miracle of the man lame from birth was not only that he could walk, but that he did not require physical therapy to develop muscle tone and to burn the muscle memory into his EPROM.

    This is some Deep Magic from the Dawn of Time.

  3. Great article. And, leave it to Lee Strobel to find evidence of miracles.

    The closest to a miracle I’ve ever witnessed is the case of a friend of mine who was a drunk before becoming a believer. Most alcoholics I’ve known continue to struggle with alcoholism for years after confessing faith in Christ. Not this guy.

    He gave up drinking literally overnight. He didn’t even have withdrawal symptoms. It’s the most radical transformation I’ve ever witnessed.

    That brings up a fairly universal question. Why did God choose to deliver that particular friend of mine from alcoholism miraculously, but not others? Like I tell my kids, that’s one of many questions I’ll have to ask when get to Heaven.

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