Clerical Errors?

A conversation on a different social media platform provoked a question in my mind that I am surprised I have never wondered:

Where are clergy in the Men’s Sphere, or the larger Dissident Right?

Not one? I know of several psychologists or paychiatrists. There are lawyers and business owners. There are more than a few military officers. College professors are becoming common. Every section of the middle class is represented except clergy. Surely I don’t know everyone, but I have been around for awhile.

Doesn’t that mean either something is deeply wrong with us, or with the clergy of every denomination?

31 thoughts on “Clerical Errors?

  1. Recently Tim Bayly commented at Dalrock’s. Also BJ has made several comments in several different posts. Luke Ford has a Lutheran pastor named Chad that calls in occasionally. I agree that is just a few and very recent.

  2. Jonadab was a pastor who got frivorced and ousted from what I remember.

    I assume most pastors aren’t fiddling around on the Internet, and if they are they have their own blog that they stick to.

  3. It’s an observation I have made as well. I was surprised to learn that almost none of the regular writers for Faith & Heritage were pastors. I do know of a few seminarians, so perhaps that is a bud of hope.

  4. But to answer your original question: yes.

    There is something wrong with the ministers in every denomination, and because the shepherds have been struck the sheep have gone astray.

    We are just the sheep that know the flock is lost and are trying to get a herd together.

  5. MtC

    I’m open to sevearl definitions. None of them seem to contain any clergy.

    Though, I do recall one Lutheran minister here once commented on headcoverings.

  6. Correction and Apology: I presumed when I guessed that a recent commenter at Dalrocks was “Tim Bayly.” The commenters name was not fully spelled out so I do not know for sure it is “Tim Bayly”. My bad, I apologize. Sorry.

  7. Technically I’m clergy, but without a lot of the characteristics most would associate with that. I have a flock of four, I myself am subject to higher ecclesiastical authority, am unmarried, have a (non-clerical) job—nothing like what comes to mind when you hear the word “pastor.”

  8. “Doesn’t that mean either something is deeply wrong with us, or with the clergy of every denomination?”

    It may just mean that the Men’s Sphere is generally pretty hard on clergymen, and when they do stumble across it by whatever means, they see it as a potential morass and steer clear of commenting.

  9. @CC

    True enough. We also have an in-group preference for men like ourselves in being opposed to the ravages of feminism, whereas we see a lot of clergymen as being part of that problem and aren’t shy about saying so.

    It must appear as a hostile zone to them, which it mostly is.

  10. I roll with a fair number of OPC clergy, and they are generally in agreement with the Men’s Sphere. They just have other stuff they have to attend to.

  11. @Bee

    No problem, we’re good.

    @LP

    True

    @Tom

    There are Apostles, bishops, deacons, and elders in, and prescribed by, the Scriptures. We may disagree in interpretation of organization, but the existence of a structure of clergy is Biblically and prudential sound.

  12. Why does anyone blog?

    The most common reason in this neck of the blogosphere is that they want a soapbox. Pastors may blog for other reasons, but soapbox-wise they already have a pulpit and a captive audience. And they have subsequent discussion in real life, while receiving blog comments is in comparison a mere shadow.

  13. They’d just get martyred like the S.B.C. guy. Also, religion often stays philisophical and aesthetic whilst such blogs often centre on the practical and political. Clergymen aren’t directly at war with the State (they’re at war with clergymen of other religions, including unofficial cults, emphasis on unofficial).

  14. @GJ

    They have pulpits. Why would they blog?

    The most common reason in this neck of the blogosphere is that they want a soapbox. Pastors may blog for other reasons, but soapbox-wise they already have a pulpit and a captive audience. And they have subsequent discussion in real life, while receiving blog comments is in comparison a mere shadow.

    This stuff always cracks me up. We just watched Paige Patterson get run down by an angry feminist mob. They didn’t just throw him under the bus, they backed the bus up and drove over him again for good measure. Now the SBC is debating whether they should pass a resolution reminding the world that they really hate guys like him.

    But clearly the reason pastors don’t want to stick their necks out online is they are just too darn happy telling the hard anti feminist truth to the people all around them.

  15. Pingback: The Dry Women | Things that We have Heard and Known

  16. @GJ

    I gather they have other reasons not to blog, even pseudonymously.

    Are you saying that the pastors in question are confronting the feminist culture in person, but eschew blogging as a medium? Or are you saying they are avoiding the conversation in person for one reason, and avoiding the same conversation online for entirely different reasons?

  17. Are you saying that the pastors in question are confronting the feminist culture in person, but eschew blogging as a medium? Or are you saying they are avoiding the conversation in person for one reason, and avoiding the same conversation online for entirely different reasons?

    I would say they are not part of the blogging community at all. I can say that my church’s pastors are busy enough dealing with church drama. The older ones lack the tech savvy, and the younger one has his hands full managing his family and his ministries.

  18. Dalrock:

    Are you saying that the pastors in question are confronting the feminist culture in person, but eschew blogging as a medium

    I am saying that if they were to confront it, they’d probably do it in person to their flock (which matters a great deal more) and generally eschew blogging about it to online strangers (largely because they don’t have all that much time, as others have also pointed out).

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