Tudor Shards

I’ve been listening to The History of England Podcast for awhile now. It’s informative of course, but also entertaining. I’ve laughed aloud countless times. There’s five years of casts so it’s taken me some time to catch up; probably a year since I started it, but I’m almost current now. He’s at the reign of Henry VIII, who has just, finally after years, broken with Rome and married Anne Boleyn. Protestant though I am: I despise her. Katherine really was abused.

The host does his best, I think, to paint everyone with their best and worst colors. Everyone comes in for criticism, but he also highlights their virtues. Still…every person reminds me of St. Paul’s comments that some vessels are made for honorable use and some for dishonorable, and that the latter are made to be broken and disposed in pursuit of God’s uses.

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22 thoughts on “Tudor Shards

  1. Henry VIII really was a detestable man. And yet, God used him to accomplish His will, which reminds me of Nebuchadnezzar.

    As for Katherine, Henry’s treatment of her (and their daughter, Mary) sure helps explain why Mary became “Bloody Mary”.

    History is fascinating, convoluted stuff.

  2. “Katherine really was abused.”

    By all accounts I’ve seen she was actually quite the good wife, of the kind we hear little about in the sphere. Accomplished, submissive, and loyal. What were the host’s criticisms of her?

    Sincerely, LP the White Knight for Katherine of Aragon.

  3. @AJP

    I found it while looking for a history of the Anglo Saxons; which is another podcast he did. Turns out: He started History of England, was unsatisfied with his work on the Anglo Saxon period, so went back and made the Anglo Saxon podcast as a separate work.

    I liked it so much I went on to the History of England podcast.

  4. As many power moves as people made several hundred years ago, politics seems even more vicious today. Classical conservatism had a harmonious effect and classical liberalism (the so-called liberals and conservatives of now) is a lot more every man for himself.

    Anybody arguing for the policies of today would be suppressed 450 years ago and they’d have to settle for less grandiose plans of destruction. Established Church and families—which is a good way to think of the system of peerages, as established families—forces everything to slow down and forces all of the rules to be more official or formalised.

    A.J.P.

  5. @ Alan J. Perrick says:
    December 18, 2017 at 11:36 am

    “As many power moves as people made several hundred years ago, politics seems even more vicious today.”

    Nobody’s getting decapitated, drawn and quartered, burned at the stake, boiled alive, or executed in any of the other torturous ways that Henry VIII’s political enemies (many of whom were previously his allies) suffered, so I can’t agree with that statement.

  6. I was talking to Mrs. Caldo today and I said to her that it was as if Europe was plowed in the 16th C. There is so much turmoil. What happens in England is somewhat small potatoes compared to what happens on the continent. Henry would have likely been given his annulment if it weren’t for continental politics.

  7. “Nobody’s getting decapitated, drawn and quartered, burned at the stake, boiled alive, or executed in any of the other torturous ways that Henry VIII’s political enemies (many of whom were previously his allies) suffered, so I can’t agree with that statement.”

    Instead, babies are murdered in the womb, young boys and girls are encouraged to cross-dress and mutilate their bodies, open perversion of all sorts is piped into every home by radio wave and Internet bits, and this is Progress.

    I’d seriously consider medieval systems as an alternative. Political bigwigs openly and secretly killing each other might be a fair trade.

  8. @ SirHamster

    When Charles V troops sacked Rome in 1527, the population of Rome was at least quartered; probably more. A third of the missing three quarters were killed. Which is to say that political bigwigs only died after lots of disinterested peasants already had.

  9. Having a foreign group replace the existing population which has clearly happened in London, and is happening only somewhat less noticeably elsewhere is casus belli, however. But those in ostensible positions of authority and leadership have gone selectively deaf to the pleas of their own people, and they’re allowed that because they’re surrounded by relativisim instead of truly established protocols.

  10. @Cane Caldo,

    Point. Was what happened in Rome recurring, and did the same happen for London?

    We’re also not done with our current age, so it’s premature to say it’s better in overall peace. An unexpected nuclear war could quickly increase modernity’s relative body count.

  11. @ Sir Hamster

    “I’d seriously consider medieval systems as an alternative.”

    Here, like at Dalrock’s, you write with the hubris of a man who hasn’t seen enough death or suffering yet.

  12. “Here, like at Dalrock’s, you write with the hubris of a man who hasn’t seen enough death or suffering yet.”

    Had I seen enough death and suffering, you posit that I will embrace the dead corpse of American society where boys are girls and girls are boys, and babies are inconvenient flesh to be butchered and sold at a mother’s whim?

    Material good ain’t that good. But I can accept the grass isn’t greener one millennia ago, and that there is good in this now to be cultivated and preserved.

    In the meanwhile, I expect the bill for present iniquity to come due soon, preferably in my lifetime rather than for the next generation.

  13. @ Sir Hamster

    Not only are you clueless on the subjects of death and suffering; you have no clue that you’re clueless. Pray you’re never forced to learn.

  14. @ Oscar

    I find it odd why you think that death and suffering will change my mind.

    My religion involves dying to self and taking up a cross daily.

    You’d make more sense to me if you told me I will suffer needlessly for no good purpose for my errors, rather than to tell me I have not suffered.

    But for that to be persuasive, you’d have to point out the error.

  15. @ Sir Hamster

    To be persuaded a man mus first recognize his ignorance. You’re too clueless to even do that. Like I said, pray you’re not forced to learn by experience.

  16. @Sir Hamster

    Was what happened in Rome recurring, and did the same happen for London?

    That whole period was turmoil. Constantinople fell not soon before, in 1453. The Ottoman’s were more than banging on the door or Europe. The Peasant Revolt in Germany (1525) resulted in 100,000 dead peasants. Before both those events, the Hussite wars claimed close to 50,000 combatant lives. That doesn’t include the noncombatants. This is a far from exhaustive list, and does not include any of the fighting nor martyring of Protestants and Roman Catholics. Seriously, the 15th and 16th Centuries are bloodbaths. I cannot imagine.

  17. Pingback: This Week In Reaction (2017/12/17) - Social Matter

  18. > Seriously, the 15th and 16th Centuries are bloodbaths. I cannot imagine.

    I see. Thanks for the elaboration.

  19. Katherine did get the shaft and remained loyal through it all. She was definitely cagey (after all she stayed alive) and Henry obviously cared for her (after all she stayed alive). But yes, in many ways she was the Good Wife and didn’t deserve getting hitched to Henry. She’s probably an instructive example for Catholic women.

  20. Not to resurrect an old post, but I’m nearly done with the History of Rome podcast and I’m happy to have found these links here. One interesting item that comes up is some of the economic reforms of Diocletion and the 3rd century lead directly to the economic structures of the middle ages.
    http://www.thehistoryofrome.typepad.com/
    Thanks!

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